Sgurr na Ruaidhe

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic. From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image. From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack. Then we descended the north-western ridge of the hill which was still covered in steep snow. We met another group of three hill-walkers, relatives of the gentlemen we ran into before. From the bealach between Sgurr … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Carn nan Gobhar

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic.

From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image. From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack.

Then we descended the north-western ridge of the hill which was still covered in steep snow. We met another group of three hill-walkers, relatives of the gentlemen we ran into before. From the bealach between Sgurr … [Read More]

2018-12-15T11:48:25+02:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic.

From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image. From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack. Then we descended the north-western ridge of the hill which was still covered in steep snow. We met another group of three hill-walkers, relatives of the gentlemen we ran into before. From the bealach between Sgurr … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Moruisg

This last but one mountain of the hill-walking holiday in September and October 2000 was to be a special one. Not only was it special for its unusually grassy character but also for the lessons in route planning and practical Gaelic it taught us. Appoaching Moruisg from the A890 road in Glen Carron we crossed the railway line and headed more or less straight up the long grassy north-west face of the hill.

The days before had seen quite some rain and the foot of the grassy hillside was a soaked sponge. We soon left the path which heads for the Corrie Toll nam Bian and went across the open hillside along the bank of one of the small burns comming down Moruisg. We had not climbed further up than 300 m when – watching a rainbow in Glen Carron – we saw that we had to put on our raingear. From the west heavy clouds and curtains of rain were approaching slowly. A few minutes later we saw the last spot of blue sky on our tour up Moruisg. We trodded up the side of the hill, zig-zagging the slope. The rain and wind got worse the higher up we came.

Moruisg is a hill that is deceptive in that you think that soon you will be on the broad ridge but it takes its time to climb the concave hillside. Finally, after some further layers of fleece having to be put on due to the very strong wind we reached Moruisg’s ridge a hundred metres west of the eastern cairn. So to the east we went and the strong westerly wind almost blew us away. We tried to rest in the lee of the cairn but there was no respite from the wind. Looking west we saw the other cairn on the big back of Moruisg and could not help but wonder whether it might be the real summit and not the cairn we were huddled behind. So, being dedicated followers … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:18:53+02:00October 1st, 2000|2000, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|