Carn Liath

As i mentioned in the sister post to this one, Cord was on his day off, which did not meant that he was off duty. Having driven me to Balsporran, then shopping in Aviemore, then fetching me up again at Balsporran and then driving us to our cottage for a nice warm lunch was much more than one can expect from a “day off”.

The lunch at home between two Munros was a first in 20 years of munrobagging. After a short rest Cord drove me to the car park at the entry of the Creag Meagaidh National Park, a most scenic area with an excellent approach path which i had to leave too soon. The walk through the birch wood was not really funny as you can imagine. Lots of bogs and water but ok’ish. Soon i reached the summit plateau where i had to navigate carefully in the featureless stony terrain due to mist. After 1h 30mins i reached the summit cairn, touched it and returned.

On the return leg i had some nice views towards Cread Meagaidh – the summit and it’s plateau which we had conquered years ago in zero sights with the help of our trusty compass. Nice. After having reached the path again i felt energetic enough to do a little return run and i arrived at our rental car where Cord was waiting reading a newspaper 1h 10min after i had left the summit. A nice afternoon exercise.

Thanks Cord for chauffeuring me!

 

2001 Clouds, spells of sunshine and strong westerly winds were forecast for this day. The weather was as predicted when I left the car park at Aberarder and vigorously walked along the path into Coire Ardair. I met several other hill walkers on my way into this very beautiful corrie. The cliffs of […]

2017-09-19T14:15:01+00:00June 2nd, 2014|2001, 2014, 2017 - 2010, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Carn Sgulain

Three in one go was the plan of the day. The weather not looking too good we anticipated another day of soaking from the sky above and the spongey terrain below. Parking the car close to Shepherds Bridge we saw rain coulds coming up Glen Banchor. We donned our full rain gear and walked along the track on the broad floor of Glen Banchor which is a beautiful and scenic spot instilling in me a feeling of remoteness that contrasts starkly to the busy village life of Kingussie only minutes away by car.

After one or two bends in the landrover track the house at Glenballoch came into view. A few metres before crossing the Allt Fionndrigh we turned right and used the landrover track leading up the glen beside the Allt. We quickly gained height at first and soon reached the more level terrain of the upper glen. From there the landrover track led us in a northwesterly direction. The glen narrowed considerably, the landrover track ended and a path led to a cut in the grassy hillside on the western side ot the glen. The path led through this cut and we very soon found ourselves on a beallach from which the whole extent of Glen Balloch could be seen – in driving rain. The terrain underfoot was 100% soaked sponge. Unfortunately my boots were not watertight anymore. Oh my, one more of those days!

From the beallach we headed up Gleann Balloch skirting the western slopes of Meall na Ceardaich and aimed for the head of the glen. From there we climbed the final 300 metres due west through a break in the crags above and got to the summit of Carn Dearg, Munro No. 1. A short rest, some sleet, some cookies, some strong wind, gloves and on we went […]

2017-09-19T14:17:06+00:00May 1st, 2009|2009, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Carn Dearg

Three in one go was the plan of the day. The weather not looking too good we anticipated another day of soaking from the sky above and the spongey terrain below. Parking the car close to Shepherds Bridge we saw rain coulds coming up Glen Banchor. We donned our full rain gear and walked along the track on the broad floor of Glen Banchor which is a beautiful and scenic spot instilling in me a feeling of remoteness that contrasts starkly to the busy village life of Kingussie only minutes away by car.

After one or two bends in the landrover track the house at Glenballoch came into view. A few metres before crossing the Allt Fionndrigh we turned right and used the landrover track leading up the glen beside the Allt. We quickly gained height at first and soon reached the more level terrain of the upper glen. From there the landrover track led us in a northwesterly direction. The glen narrowed considerably, the landrover track ended and a path led to a cut in the grassy hillside on the western side ot the glen. The path led through this cut and we very soon found ourselves on a beallach from which the whole extent of Glen Balloch could be seen – in driving rain. The terrain underfoot was 100% soaked sponge. Unfortunately my boots were not watertight anymore. Oh my, one more of those days! From the beallach we headed up Gleann Balloch skirting the western slopes of Meall na Ceardaich and aimed for the head of the glen. From there we climbed the final 300 metres due west through a break in the crags above and got to the summit of Carn Dearg, Munro No. 1. A short rest, some sleet, some cookies, some strong wind, gloves and on we went […]

2017-09-19T14:17:06+00:00May 1st, 2009|2009, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

A’Chailleach

Three in one go was the plan of the day. The weather not looking too good we anticipated another day of soaking from the sky above and the spongey terrain below. Parking the car close to Shepherds Bridge we saw rain coulds coming up Glen Banchor. We donned our full rain gear and walked along the track on the broad floor of Glen Banchor which is a beautiful and scenic spot instilling in me a feeling of remoteness that contrasts starkly to the busy village life of Kingussie only minutes away by car.

After one or two bends in the landrover track the house at Glenballoch came into view. A few metres before crossing the Allt Fionndrigh we turned right and used the landrover track leading up the glen beside the Allt. We quickly gained height at first and soon reached the more level terrain of the upper glen. From there the landrover track led us in a northwesterly direction. The glen narrowed considerably, the landrover track ended and a path led to a cut in the grassy hillside on the western side ot the glen. The path led through this cut and we very soon found ourselves on a beallach from which the whole extent of Glen Balloch could be seen – in driving rain. The terrain underfoot was 100% soaked sponge. Unfortunately my boots were not watertight anymore. Oh my, one more of those days! From the beallach we headed up Gleann Balloch skirting the western slopes of Meall na Ceardaich and aimed for the head of the glen.

From there we climbed the final 300 metres due west through a break in the crags above and got to the summit of Carn Dearg, Munro No. 1. A short rest, some sleet, some cookies, some strong wind, gloves and on we went […]

2017-09-19T14:17:06+00:00May 1st, 2009|2009, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Geal Charn

This hill being the first in the 2009 outing we were still quite stiff when it came to getting our act together: putting on the gear, stuffing the rucksack, lacing the boots and all. Finally we were ready, though, and set out from Garva Bridge to climb this solitary Munro.

We crossed the infant River Spey, followed the landrover track for a few hundred metres and then walked on the open turf in the general direction of Geal Charn’s southwest ridge. At the confluence of the Allt Coire nan Dearcag and Feith Talagain the grassy path started to become a little steeper and the first stones appeared. We tramped up the ridge and were soon engulfed by fog and clouds. Passing a few minor crags at about 600m located on the western side of the hill the path climbed the somewhat steeper middle section of the hill before leveling out close to the summit.

Visibility was restricted to maybe 20 metres when we reached the cairn. A short break, a sip of water, one Mars bar, rucksack back on and off we went. With no views to be had of the rest of the Monadhliath hills we skipped the idea of returning by way of Glen Markie and simply retraced our steps to the car. A good hill for a short afternoon hike. A pleasant way to start the holiday and one of the few hills in 2009 which did not put our waterproof gear to the test! 🙂

2018-08-30T09:03:51+00:00April 30th, 2009|2009, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Beinn a’Chaorainn

The two hills closest to our cottage had to be climbed this holiday. Beinn Teallach having the reputation of being a rather dull hill and Beinn a’Chaorainn being renowned for featuring nice cornices in winter and for carrying with it a longish dispute as to which of its summits really is the highest one.

As the books propose, we started out from the A86 at the parking close to the bridge over Roughburn. We walked up the forrest road, turned left at a junction and left the road at a firebreak. From here onwards the terrain was very boggy until we reached the stile which straddles the fence separating the plantation from the open hillside. From the stile we followed the footpath that first contours around Meall Clachaig and then gradually gains height until it peters out on the easy south-western slopes of Beinn a’Chaorainn. The wind picked up when we reached an altitude of about 900m so we had to put on our raingear.

Soon after we reached the cloud base we also reached the main ridge of the hill somewhere between the south top and the central summit of the hill. The cornices which form at the rim of the eastern corries in winter were still very much present. Soon we reached the central summit of the hill. We touched the cairn and carried on. Visibility was very modest and as soon as we reached the north top we headed north-west to the bealach between the two hills. When we dropped below the clouds we sat down at a reasonably sheltered place, ate our sandwiches and drank some hot tea. Then we headed down to the bealach and the massive cairn which sits on it.

At the cairn Alex decided to call it a day and to walk back on the path along the Allt […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 3rd, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Beinn Teallach

The two hills closest to our cottage had to be climbed this holiday. Beinn Teallach having the reputation of being a rather dull hill and Beinn a’Chaorainn being renowned for featuring nice cornices in winter and for carrying with it a longish dispute as to which of its summits really is the highest one. As the books propose, we started out from the A86 at the parking close to the bridge over Roughburn. We walked up the forrest road, turned left at a junction and left the road at a firebreak. From here onwards the terrain was very boggy until we reached the stile which straddles the fence separating the plantation from the open hillside. From the stile we followed the footpath that first contours around Meall Clachaig and then gradually gains height until it peters out on the easy south-western slopes of Beinn a’Chaorainn. The wind picked up when we reached an altitude of about 900m so we had to put on our raingear. Soon after we reached the cloud base we also reached the main ridge of the hill somewhere between the south top and the central summit of the hill. The cornices which form at the rim of the eastern corries in winter were still very much present. Soon we reached the central summit of the hill. We touched the cairn and carried on. Visibility was very modest and as soon as we reached the north top we headed north-west to the bealach between the two hills. When we dropped below the clouds we sat down at a reasonably sheltered place, ate our sandwiches and drank some hot tea. Then we headed down to the bealach and the massive cairn which sits on it. At the cairn Alex decided to call it a day and to walk back on the path […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 3rd, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Stob Poite Coire Ardair

Two years ago I had walked up the path in Coire Ardair in late winter. This time in May 2003 Frank and I did not see any snow on the corrie ground. We set off from Aberarder Farm, walked up the the path in the beautiful setting of Coire Ardair and reached the section of the path below the Coire Ardair cliffs of Creag Meagaidh at the lochan after an hour or so.

We had a snack and pressed ahead to the pass at the head of the corrie. Once we had reached the Window we climbed up steep pathless grass slopes in a northerly direction and then followed the path east on the stony ridge to the summit of Stob Poite Coire Ardrair. The first Munro of the day. The first Munro I ever did twice. We returned to the Window and followed the path in a south/south easterly direction up the broad shoulder of Creag Meagaidh until we reached the corrie rim above the Coire Ardair cliffs still topped by cornices. From there we continued in a south-westerly then west-south-westerly direction over the flat plateau until we reached the huge cairn preceeding the summit.

At the real summit we had a break and admired the views: Fog and clouds interrupted by short glimpses of the corries below. With the arrival of other walkers at the summit we packed our rucksacks again and headed back across the vast plateau in an easterly direction guided by occasional compass readings. We crossed the rather featureless terrain, reached Puist Coire Ardair and headed further on to Sron a’Ghoire. On this part of the ridge we were lucky enough to get some very fine views of the northern bounding ridge of Coire Ardair.

Below Sron a’Ghoire we followed a developing path along the Allt Bealach a’Ghoire to the bridge over […]

2017-09-19T14:18:51+00:00May 1st, 2003|2003, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Creag Meagaidh

Two years ago I had walked up the path in Coire Ardair in late winter. This time in May 2003 Frank and I did not see any snow on the corrie ground. We set off from Aberarder Farm, walked up the the path in the beautiful setting of Coire Ardair and reached the section of the path below the Coire Ardair cliffs of Creag Meagaidh at the lochan after an hour or so.

We had a snack and pressed ahead to the pass at the head of the corrie. Once we had reached the Window we climbed up steep pathless grass slopes in a northerly direction and then followed the path east on the stony ridge to the summit of Stob Poite Coire Ardrair. The first Munro of the day. The first Munro I ever did twice. We returned to the Window and followed the path in a south/south easterly direction up the broad shoulder of Creag Meagaidh until we reached the corrie rim above the Coire Ardair cliffs still topped by cornices. From there we continued in a south-westerly then west-south-westerly direction over the flat plateau until we reached the huge cairn preceeding the summit.

At the real summit we had a break and admired the views: Fog and clouds interrupted by short glimpses of the corries below. With the arrival of other walkers at the summit we packed our rucksacks again and headed back across the vast plateau in an easterly direction guided by occasional compass readings. We crossed the rather featureless terrain, reached Puist Coire Ardair and headed further on to Sron a’Ghoire. On this part of the ridge we were lucky enough to get some very fine views of the northern bounding ridge of Coire Ardair.

Below Sron a’Ghoire we followed a developing path along the Allt Bealach a’Ghoire to the bridge over […]

2017-09-19T14:18:51+00:00May 1st, 2003|2003, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|