Ben Oss

In stark contrast to their famous neighbour Beinn Laoigh these two Munros permitted us to enjoy a sunny and warm day on their ridges. We had spent the night in Crianlarich and wanted to climb two Munros en route before moving into our base for the week, a cottage in Invergarry. After a good Scottish breakfast in the Crianlarich Hotel we drove the few miles to Dalrigh and left our faithful car in the large parking provided for the hillwalkers.

The bridge over the River Fillan and the landrover track leading west by the railtracks delivered us at another bridge, this time over the railway line. Immediately after the bridge we left the landrover track, crossed the Allt Gleann Auchreoch and followed the path on the left bank of the burn. The continuation was quite beautiful. Old trees, dry and wet meadows on the bank of the tumbling burn, sunshine and a meandering path allowed us to gradually gain height. When we reached more open land we passed a plantation of fir trees and then steadily climbed towards the northeast ridge of Beinn Dubhchraig.

Soon we reached the summit of the first Munro and enjoyed the views for a while. Then it was back to the beallach between Beinn Dubhchraig and Ben Oss from where we contoured around the southwest face of Beinn Oss and finally climbed the second Munro by its steepisch south ridge. Maybe an unusual way of approching the hill but the views of Loch Oss and Coire Garbh compensated for the extra kilometre or two of walking. At the summit of Beinn Oss we paused for a snack and the vies of Beinn Lui. Very nice indeed!

But we did not linger for very long because we still had to buy provisions for the week in Fort William. Walking down the interesting and rocky northeast ridge of Ben Oss we used some snowfields to speed up our progress towards the beallach below. From the beallach we climbed up the … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:16:19+02:00May 8th, 2010|2010, 2018 - 2010, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Beinn Dubhchraig

In stark contrast to their famous neighbour Beinn Laoigh these two Munros permitted us to enjoy a sunny and warm day on their ridges. We had spent the night in Crianlarich and wanted to climb two Munros en route before moving into our base for the week, a cottage in Invergarry. After a good Scottish breakfast in the Crianlarich Hotel we drove the few miles to Dalrigh and left our faithful car in the large parking provided for the hillwalkers.

The bridge over the River Fillan and the landrover track leading west by the railtracks delivered us at another bridge, this time over the railway line. Immediately after the bridge we left the landrover track, crossed the Allt Gleann Auchreoch and followed the path on the left bank of the burn. The continuation was quite beautiful. Old trees, dry and wet meadows on the bank of the tumbling burn, sunshine and a meandering path allowed us to gradually gain height. When we reached more open land we passed a plantation of fir trees and then steadily climbed towards the northeast ridge of Beinn Dubhchraig. Soon we reached the summit of the first Munro and enjoyed the vies for a while. Then it was back to the beallach between Beinn Dubhchraig and Ben Oss from where we contoured around the southwest face of Beinn Oss and finally climbed the second Munro by its steepisch south ridge. Maybe an unusual way of approching the hill but the views of Loch Oss and Coire Garbh compensated for the extra kilometre or two of walking. At the summit of Beinn Oss we paused for a snack and the vies of Beinn Lui. Very nice indeed! But we did not linger for very long because we still had to buy provisions for the week in Fort William.

Walking down the interesting and rocky northeast ridge of Ben Oss we used some snowfields to speed up our progress towards the beallach below. From the beallach we climbed up the … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:16:19+02:00May 8th, 2010|2010, 2018 - 2010, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Beinn Chabhair

Warm weather, sunshine, weekend. Friday 7 May 2010 saw Frank and me driving from EDI to Crianlarich. The first day of a hill-walking holiday is always special since the long wait for Alba is finally over and we are both eager to get out of the car and into our boots. We reached Crianlarich, dropped our stuff in the Crianlarich Hotel and drove on to Inverarnan where we parked the car, packed our rucksacks for the afternoon walk and soon followed the trunk road (A82) to where the access road to Beinglas farm branches off.

After a few minutes we left the farm behind us and started the steep cimb up the tree studded hillside left of the Ben Glas Burn. The path reaches the open moor to the south of Ben Glas at 350m. In the upper glen the path follows the burn all the way through to Lochan Beinn Chabair. We were lucky that it hadn’t rained much in the days before since the terrain can probably be very boggy after prolonged periods of bad weather. From the Lochan we climbed an overgrown boulderfield and reached a grassy gully which we walked up all the way to the beallach between Meall nan Tarmachan and Beinn Chabhair. There we turned right and and followed the path on the ridge through and over some outcrops all the way to the little summit plateau of Munro No. 1 of the 2010 holiday.

The views of the Crianlarich hills were good and our legs were glad they could rest for while. The wind at the summit was not too strong so we lingered a bit. Then we said goodbye to the cairn and retreated towards Glen Falloch by the way of ascent. The grassy glen below Lochan Beinn Chabhair allowed us a relaxed walk to Beinglas farm with only the last steep 300m of the descent hurting my rather untrained legs a bit. We got back to the car after less than five hours. An … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:16:19+02:00May 7th, 2010|2010, 2018 - 2010, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

An Caisteal

On the morning of 30 April 2005 Frank and I were to meet Alex and Paul at the parking where the River Falloch joins the A82 in Glen Falloch. But by coincidence both pairs of walkers had decided to buy a few provisions in the Crianlarich shop and thus we shook hands and hugged each other on the doorstep of the shop. From there we drove to the parking by the A82. The weather was fine and the sun shone for much of the day. We started the walk up the landrover track beside the River Falloch but soon left it and headed south over the open and slightly wet grassland up the slope leading to Sron Garbh. The gradient of this slope gets steeper the higher up you get but at about 700m the ridge levels off and Sron Garbh is reached. There we paused, drank some water and enjoyed the views of Cruach Ardrain, Ben More and the other hills surrounding us. Our foursome continued over the bumps of Twistin Hill to the point where the final rise to the summit ridge of An Caisteal was waiting for us. We had mistaken the rocks above us for the summit proper which is a few hundred metres further to the south. With the summit in sight we took another break to eat a sandwich and a few bisquits. Then we walked on to the summit of An Caisteal, the first Munro. After a short while we left the cairn and followed the path down An Caisteal’s south-east ridge. Here the terrain changed markedly. The hitherto grassy ridge gave way to crags and – further down – boulders through which the path weaves to the col below Beinn a’Chroin. The west face of this hill is quite steep and we could not really tell where exactly the route ahead would lead up the hill. We soon found out that the path rises over the grassy south-west slope of Beinn a’Chroin traverses some … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:54+02:00April 30th, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Beinn a’Chroin

On the morning of 30 April 2005 Frank and I were to meet Alex and Paul at the parking where the River Falloch joins the A82 in Glen Falloch. But by coincidence both pairs of walkers had decided to buy a few provisions in the Crianlarich shop and thus we shook hands and hugged each other on the doorstep of the shop. From there we drove to the parking by the A82. The weather was fine and the sun shone for much of the day. We started the walk up the landrover track beside the River Falloch but soon left it and headed south over the open and slightly wet grassland up the slope leading to Sron Garbh. The gradient of this slope gets steeper the higher up you get but at about 700m the ridge levels off and Sron Garbh is reached. There we paused, drank some water and enjoyed the views of Cruach Ardrain, Ben More and the other hills surrounding us. Our foursome continued over the bumps of Twistin Hill to the point where the final rise to the summit ridge of An Caisteal was waiting for us. We had mistaken the rocks above us for the summit proper which is a few hundred metres further to the south. With the summit in sight we took another break to eat a sandwich and a few bisquits. Then we walked on to the summit of An Caisteal, the first Munro. After a short while we left the cairn and followed the path down An Caisteal’s south-east ridge. Here the terrain changed markedly. The hitherto grassy ridge gave way to crags and – further down – boulders through which the path weaves to the col below Beinn a’Chroin. The west face of this hill is quite steep and we could not really tell where exactly the route ahead would lead up the hill. We soon found out that the path rises over the grassy south-west slope of Beinn a’Chroin traverses some … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:54+02:00April 30th, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Ben More

Ben More and Stob Binnein (2004-05-13). We had shyed away from doing these two hills on the second day of our vacation as the weather had been uncertain and we wanted to make sure that we would get the most out of the circuit of these two famous Munros. So, after having completed six exhausting walks that week we finally set out to climb the biggest Ben More in Scotland. Us being keen on a good ridge walk and not only on bagging the two hills we had decided to do the full circle of Coire Chaorach.

We started just east of the bridge over the Allt Coire Chaorach on the A85. The track there lead into the fir plantations. After about fifteen minutes we reached the burn and crossed it by some stepping stones. The track then climbed uphill with some steep and some slightly boggy sections. There must have been some path improvements in recent years because it did not require good boots and a sense of humour (Storer) to reach the forrest edge. From that point we struck a line up the corrie heading in a south-easterly direction to join the ridge by means of an obvious grass slope leading up to Leacann Raibhach. Once on the ridge we continued in a south-westerly direction until, after some prodding around in the clouds, we reached the cairn of Stob Creagach. The terrain was a little confusing, since the ridge is quite knobby and visibility was limited to about 50 to 100 metres in the clouds. Nonetheless we decided that no real threat of getting lost existed since even our modest navigational skills should allow us to stick to a south-westerly direction and to keep clear of the steep slopes above Coire Chaorach.

The next kilometre the ridge was even more rocky and knobby. We had some route-finding difficulties but made it to the summit of Meall na Dige alright. Soon we descended a few metres to a flatter section, the bealach between this … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:54+02:00May 13th, 2004|2004, 2009 - 2000, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Stob Binnein

Ben More and Stob Binnein (2004-05-13). We had shyed away from doing these two hills on the second day of our vacation as the weather had been uncertain and we wanted to make sure that we would get the most out of the circuit of these two famous Munros. So, after having completed six exhausting walks that week we finally set out to climb the biggest Ben More in Scotland. Us being keen on a good ridge walk and not only on bagging the two hills we had decided to do the full circle of Coire Chaorach.

We started just east of the bridge over the Allt Coire Chaorach on the A85. The track there lead into the fir plantations. After about fifteen minutes we reached the burn and crossed it by some stepping stones. The track then climbed uphill with some steep and some slightly boggy sections. There must have been some path improvements in recent years because it did not require good boots and a sense of humour (Storer) to reach the forrest edge. From that point we struck a line up the corrie heading in a south-easterly direction to join the ridge by means of an obvious grass slope leading up to Leacann Raibhach. Once on the ridge we continued in a south-westerly direction until, after some prodding around in the clouds, we reached the cairn of Stob Creagach. The terrain was a little confusing, since the ridge is quite knobby and visibility was limited to about 50 to 100 metres in the clouds. Nonetheless we decided that no real threat of getting lost existed since even our modest navigational skills should allow us to stick to a south-westerly direction and to keep clear of the steep slopes above Coire Chaorach.

The next kilometre the ridge was even more rocky and knobby. We had some route-finding difficulties but made it to the summit of Meall na Dige alright. Soon we descended a few metres to a flatter section, the … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:54+02:00May 13th, 2004|2004, 2009 - 2000, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Ben Chonzie

The first hill in Scotland in 2004. Around noon our plane had landed at Edinburgh Airport. Two hours later we reached the parking at the dam of Loch Turret. The routine of getting our stuff togehter before the walk had become a little rusty. It took us some time to get things going but finally we were on our way along the land-rover track on the east side of Loch Turret. The going was easy, the weather was warm, the sun shone. As expected we made good progress and reached Lochan Uaine after about an hour and fifteen minutes. The broken cliffs of Ben Chonzie high above the lochan did not look boring at all. At least not to us: a year (and more) of abstinence from all Scottish hills helped us enjoy this undemanding Munro. A snack and some water and off we went heading for the col between Biorach a’ Mheannain and Ben Chonzie. The grassy back wall of the corrie is steep below the col. Once at the col we turned left and climbed steadily for maybe another 20 minutes until we saw the cairn of Ben Chonzie. There we congratulated each other on our first hill of the year, looked around identifying hills further to the west and north and had another little meal by the cairn. The hill’s a good viewpoint. We continued our tour around Loch Turret by following the grassy ridge which has some stretches of open peat and can be boggy in places. At Carn Chois we paused again. Nice views of the Loch below and the sky above. It had become a little colder and windier on the ridge. A few hundred metres after the summit of Carn Chois we picked a line down into the grassy corrie leading to the loch and the track on its west side which took us back to the dam and the car. Easy walk, good weather, nice start for a week of hill walking in the Southern … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:56+02:00May 7th, 2004|2004, 2009 - 2000, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Ben Lui

Ben Lui. The great hill of the Southern Highlands. The cradle of Scottish winter mountaineering. The symmetrical monarch of the Cononish Glen. Jokes aside this hill proved to be one of the really interesting ones even though we walked it under an almost continuously closed cover of clouds the base of which lingered at around 800 m. As the starting point we had opted for the parking of the lower station at Tyndrum. We walked along the forrest road on the low slopes of Sron nan Colan until we reached the junction with the land-rover track up Glen Cononish.

We passed the farm and continued up the glen up to the point where the land rover track turns into a path that crosses the Allt an Rund and heads up over steep ground into Coire Gaothach. Magnificent corrie even when the upper parts of Ben Lui’s ridge are not visible. We continued up the bowl of the corrie and aimed left for the point in the skyline where the rocky North-East ridge becomes really steep above Stob an Tighe Aird. The weather not being really agreeable we decided not to climb to the summt directly but rather to cross the shallow corrie further east, climb its headwall and gain the easy ridge leading up to the summit all the way from the Ben Lui/Ben Oss col.

A little rain set in on the final metres before the summit but it subsided again. Sitting in the clouds at the summit cairn we had a snack and took in the few (rather vertical) views that could be had of Coire Gaothach below. We then followed the ridge to the second summit of Ben Lui and started our return walk down the north-west ridge which was steep on the first few hundred metres. Soon we reached the col before Stob Garbh and walked down the path into the corrie where the path back down to the Allt an Rund, Cononish farm and finally Tyndrum was regained. … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:18:50+02:00May 1st, 2003|2003, 2009 - 2000, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|

Ben Lomond

This being the first hill of a ten-day outing Frank and I reached the car park on the east shore of Loch Lomond at Rowardennan Youth Hostel by 3 p.m. We put on our gear, set off and —- missed the path behind the toilet block. Instead we followed another track which led us into thickets and plantations of young fir trees. After some plodding around we reached a clearing and regained the tourist path up Ben Lomond. From then on it was plain sailing. We quickly reached Sron Aonaich and trodded up the path to the higher regions of the Ben. Engulfed in clouds. No views. The final steepening and the following flat section of the ridge announced the arrival at the summit of Ben Lomond. Soon we reached the cairn, had a snack, took a few pictures and congratulated each other on having done one of the four geographically extreme Munros: The most southerly one. With the days work done and no views to be had we decided to head back to the car without further ado. No Ptarmigain ridge today. After just under four hours we got back to the car, threw our stuff into the boot and headed off for the B&B, meal and a few pints at Drymen. Easy first day.

2017-09-19T14:18:50+02:00May 1st, 2003|2003, 2009 - 2000, Loch Lomond to Loch Tay|