Compleating The Munros – Next Try

After failed compleating in June we didn’t wailed for long but put ourself together and planned our next trip to Scotland. So we are going again in September, fly in to Edinburgh, drive to Corrie Hallie, walk in to Shenavall, built up our tents, will have a nice outdoor meal and of course a wee dram or two, sleep well, get up early in the morning AND will hopefully finally bag Ruadh Stac Mòr and A’Mhaighdean. Then we will walk out and drive to Ullapool and will have a compleater curry and hopefully lots of beers. And while we are in that marvellous area there should be a return to An Teallach, one of our first Munros. Definitely looking forward to that microadventure.

2017-06-29T11:50:14+00:00 June 29th, 2017|Uncategorized|

Munro Count 2

It is as it is. We missed our compleating goal. 280 in the sack, 2 Munros left: A’Mhaighdean and Ruadh Stac Mor in Fisherfield Forest. We blame organizational faults and of course the weather. So another last trip is what we need to compleate. Nothing planned yet but we will for sure come again.

2017-06-16T13:10:58+00:00 June 16th, 2017|2017, Uncategorized|

Sgurr Dearg – The InPin

On a dry day in May 2007 the two valiant hill-walkers set out to climb the Inaccessible Pinnacle and Sgurr Mhic Choinnich in one outing. Alas, it was not to be (in its entirety, d’you see?). But let’s start at the beginning.

From Glen Brittle House we climbed the path leading to the Eas Mor and once past the waterfall we branched right in the direction of Loch an Fhir-bhallaich. Half-way to the loch another path branches off to the left and approaches the steep west ridge of Sgurr Dearg. Gaining height quite quickly the view soon opened up and Corrie na Bachachdich impressed with its great scenery. At about 750 m the clouds finally won and we climbed up the final steep, slabby and stoney steps of the ridge before reaching the summit of Sgurr Dearg. There the Inaccessible Pinnacle finally became visible through the clouds. Nice piece of rock. We slithered to the basis of the pinnacle and checked the start of the climb.

Other groups of climbers made their way up the Inaccessible Pinnacle while we watched. Finally we started our climb – without using the rope. We soon realised that the climb was not really difficult but quite exposed. And since we had not really expected the need for using the rope for other purposes than abseiling we decided to be wise and go back and to leave the In Pinn for another day. I explored the summit of An Stac before Frank and I contoured around its basis on the scree-strewn slanting path leading to the broadish (by Skye standards at least) Beallach Corrie Laggan. About here the visibility improved dramatically and the views were stupendous later.

From the beallach we followed the trace of a path that leads up to Sgurr Mhic Choinnich. This part of our hike […]

2017-06-13T09:35:31+00:00 June 9th, 2017|2007, 2017, The Islands|

Sgurr Dubh Mor

June 2017 was a rather wet month in the Northwest Highlands. Frank and I had experienced what it means to be scrambling in the Skye Cuillins in bad weather in 2007 when we climbed five Skye Munros in clag, got drenched to the bones on more than one occasion and turned back a few dozen metres below the summit of Sgurr Dubh Mor because the rocks were wet and slippery on the more exposed parts of the scramble. So this time we patiently waited for a weather forecast predicting acceptable conditions in the Cuillins.

Thursday 8 June 2017 was such a day. At about nine o’clock we parked our car at the end of the public road in Glen Brittle and set off towards Coire a’Ghrunnda. The going on the broad path was easy until we rounded Sron na Ciche and the steep rocky climb into Coire a’Ghrunnda proper started. Once the first steep section was completed at about 400m the lip of the upper corrie girt by large rocks, boulder fields and the outflow of the loch cascading down over a succession of slabs came into view about 250m above our present position. We continued the climb up the steep path on the very left-hand side of the corrie through scree and over boulders in the passing company of three or four other groups of hikers. Some minor scrambling was called for before we reached the Loch Coire a’Ghrunnda at about 700m. This is a real gem of a corrie! We sat close by the shoreline of the loch and marvelled at the scenery trying to name the hills which encircle the loch.

Our aim was Sgurr Dubh Mor which is not visible from the corrie since its slightly lower sibling Sgurr Dubh an da Bheinn and Caisteal a’ Garbh-choire line the main Cuillin […]

2017-07-10T08:01:54+00:00 June 8th, 2017|2017, The Islands|

Bruach na Frithe

Am Basteir and Bruach na Frithe. I decided to climb them in one go in order to explore as much as possible of the features of Corrie a’ Basteir. From Sligachan Hotel I followed the path up the Allt Dearg Beag to where it forks at the waterfalls and this time did not continue on the path to Sgurr nan Gillean but went up the left bank of the Allt to a spot 2km further on where it meets a wall of rock and scree which guards the Basteir Gorge. I climbed up scree and bands of rock to find myself above the Gorge and below the Pinnacle Ridge of Sgurr nan Gillean which is a very impressive view from there. Following the Allt Dearg Beag to the Lochan in Corrie a’ Basteir I continued along the path which winds its way through the scree on the north eastern wall of the Corrie a’ Basteir to a place where it forks blow the awesome northern wall of Am Basteir. I continued up the left fork and climbed up to the Bealach a’ Basteir where I rested. Soon I embarked on climbing the east ridge of Am Basteir and made my way to about the middle of the ridge where an awkward vertical drop of about 2m blocks the way. I detoured and outflanked it on the southern side on some bands of rock which took me back to the crest and then to the summit of the hill. The wind freshening and some rain clouds comming in from the west I soon went back along the crest of the ridge to the vertical step which I climbed and made my way back to the Bealach a’ Basteir – not without some additional scrambling on the ridge. From there I returned down the scree to […]

2017-06-15T16:04:57+00:00 June 3rd, 2017|2000, 2017, The Islands|

Am Basteir

Am Basteir and Bruach na Frithe. I decided to climb them in one go in order to explore as much as possible of the features of Corrie a’ Basteir. From Sligachan Hotel I followed the path up the Allt Dearg Beag to where it forks at the waterfalls and this time did not continue on the path to Sgurr nan Gillean but went up the left bank of the Allt to a spot 2km further on where it meets a wall of rock and scree which guards the Basteir Gorge. I climbed up scree and bands of rock to find myself above the Gorge and below the Pinnacle Ridge of Sgurr nan Gillean which is a very impressive view from there. Following the Allt Dearg Beag to the Lochan in Corrie a’ Basteir I continued along the path which winds its way through the scree on the north eastern wall of the Corrie a’ Basteir to a place where it forks blow the awesome northern wall of Am Basteir. I continued up the left fork and climbed up to the Bealach a’ Basteir where I rested. Soon I embarked on climbing the east ridge of Am Basteir and made my way to about the middle of the ridge where an awkward vertical drop of about 2m blocks the way. I detoured and outflanked it on the southern side on some bands of rock which took me back to the crest and then to the summit of the hill. The wind freshening and some rain clouds comming in from the west I soon went back along the crest of the ridge to the vertical step which I climbed and made my way back to the Bealach a’ Basteir – not without some additional scrambling on the ridge. From there I returned down the scree to […]

2017-06-15T16:05:29+00:00 June 3rd, 2017|2000, 2017, The Islands|