Bidein a’Choire Sheasgaich

6 June 2017 was a rather wet and windy day. It wasn’t too bad when we parked our Audi outside Attadale Gardens in the lot provided for hikers’ cars. Only later, on the hills, did the downpour really thrash us.

This early in the day, however, spirits were high. But we were also a little apprehensive of the task ahead since the cycle tour to the bothy at Bendronaig Lodge is no piece of cake. And after one kilometre on flat ground the 300m climb to the high point of the hydro road above Loch na Caillich and below Meall Ruadh (454m) started. This was steep in many sections but also had one or two stretches which provided some respite. Do I need to mention that we were overtaken by quite a few lorries making their way towards the hydro constructions further up the Glen?

From the highpoint of the road at about 330m it was a long swoosh down to the bridge over the Black Water where the hydro construction village was situated. Another kilometre on the new hydro road got us to the bothy. There we paused, changed into hiking gear and set off in the rain towards Loch Calavie. On a better day we would have enjoyed the remoteness of the surrounding hills and the setting of the loch but on 6 June 2017 the place looked dreary to desolate. Sorry to say.

At the loch we pause for a snack and then climbed the steepish hillside beside the Allt Coire Calavie. In fact there are several small streams but the Allt Coire Calavie is the biggest and most easterly burn. For me the going was tough as the ground was soaked and the wind hit us front-on. I made it to the col between the two Munros: Cheesecake to the left (i.e. northwest), […]

2017-09-19T14:14:56+00:00June 6th, 2017|2017, 2017 - 2010, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Lurg Mhor

6 June 2017 was a rather wet and windy day. It wasn’t too bad when we parked our Audi outside Attadale Gardens in the lot provided for hikers’ cars. Only later, on the hills, did the downpour really thrash us.

This early in the day, however, spirits were high. But we were also a little apprehensive of the task ahead since the cycle tour to the bothy at Bendronaig Lodge is no piece of cake. And after one kilometre on flat ground the 300m climb to the high point of the hydro road above Loch na Caillich and below Meall Ruadh (454m) started. This was steep in many sections but also had one or two stretches which provided some respite. Do I need to mention that we were overtaken by quite a few lorries making their way towards the hydro constructions further up the Glen?

From the highpoint of the road at about 330m it was a long swoosh down to the bridge over the Black Water where the hydro construction village was situated. Another kilometre on the new hydro road got us to the bothy. There we paused, changed into hiking gear and set off in the rain towards Loch Calavie. On a better day we would have enjoyed the remoteness of the surrounding hills and the setting of the loch but on 6 June 2017 the place looked dreary to desolate. Sorry to say.

At the loch we pause for a snack and then climbed the steepish hillside beside the Allt Coire Calavie. In fact there are several small streams but the Allt Coire Calavie is the biggest and most easterly burn. For me the going was tough as the ground was soaked and the wind hit us front-on. I made it to the col between the two Munros: Cheesecake to the left (i.e. northwest), […]

2017-09-19T14:14:56+00:00June 6th, 2017|2017, 2017 - 2010, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron, looking forward to|

Maoile Lunndaidh

Craig in Glen Carron. Today this place was to be the starting point for another hike high above the bank of the Allt a’Chonais and later in Gleann Fhiodhaig. We had started walks here in 2008 (Sgurr Choinnch and Sgurr a’Chaorachain) and in 2009 (Sgurr nan Ceannaichean before the SMC stole this Munro from our list).

We used bicycles for the approach to Maoile Lunndaidh and rode/pushed them up the Landrover track for almost 10 km until we reached the small fir plantation in Gleann Fhiodhaig which can be found 1 km before the track reaches Glenuaig Lodge. There we left the bicycles and started a gently rising traverse across the grassy hillside towards the north ridge of Maoile Lunndaidh. On the way we crossed the An Crom allt and headed towards the outflow of the lochans nestled in the narrow corrie (Fuar tholl Mor) between the Munro of the day and the north ridge of Carn nam Fiaclan. It was a wet and overcast day. Visibility was moderate at first.

At an altitude of about 500 m the grass began to be sprinkled with snow and as soon as we reached the level floor of the quite impressive Fuar tholl Mor snow covered the ground completely. From the corrie we climbed up a rocky spur covered in heather making good use of a faint path. Then all that was left was to climb the very broad and open north ridge of Maoile Lunndaidh, which was quite steep initially and progress over (or through) the knee-deep snow was a real effort. We zigzagged our way up the ridge making good use of grass and stones which barely peeked out from the deep snow.

Then the ridge levelled off and the visibility became much better. We even enjoyed a spot of sunshine when we arrived at […]

2017-09-19T14:14:59+00:00April 29th, 2015|2015, 2017 - 2010, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr a’Chaorachain

Ah Skye, you beautiful island. And Cuillin, you great range of towering spires. But the weather sucked. Very much so. So we decided to let island be island and Cuillin be Cuillin. Instead we headed for Glen Carron where some more or less remote munros waited for us.

As recommended by the books we parked our car at Craig, enjoyed the only rainfall of the day (lucky us – the clouds lifted the longer the day wore on), crossed the railway line and the river and followed the landrover track high above the Allt a’Chonais. After an hour or so we reached the plain stretch of valley where the Allt a’Chonais meanders through the grass and Sgurr nan Ceannaichean’s craggy west face rises on the right side of the track.

At the point where the track veers to the left we crossed the Allt, by the wire bridge (Frank) and by wading the rivulet (me), and then hit the well-engineered path leading up to the Beallach Bhearnais. This was a pleasant climb. Below the col we felt the effect of the wind which was really quite strong, coming from south-westerly directions. We donned all the gear we had to protect us from the wind chill. From the Beallach Bhearnais we plodded and scrambled up the west ridge of Frank’s last two-digit munro – his 99th – Sgurr Choinnch.

On the climb we paused and took in the views of Cheesecake and Lurgh Mhor: two hills requiring considerably more effort than the present tour. They looked nice though. We’ll be back (Austrian accent :-)). At the summit we ate our lunch sitting on some grassy ledges on the north side of the hill which provided some respite from the wind. Photos, tea, sandwiches. And on to Sgurr a’Chaorachain we headed, half pushed forward and half […]

2017-09-19T14:17:50+00:00May 21st, 2007|2007, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr Choinnich

Ah Skye, you beautiful island. And Cuillin, you great range of towering spires. But the weather sucked. Very much so. So we decided to let island be island and Cuillin be Cuillin. Instead we headed for Glen Carron where some more or less remote munros waited for us.

As recommended by the books we parked our car at Craig, enjoyed the only rainfall of the day (lucky us – the clouds lifted the longer the day wore on), crossed the railway line and the river and followed the landrover track high above the Allt a’Chonais. After an hour or so we reached the plain stretch of valley where the Allt a’Chonais meanders through the grass and Sgurr nan Ceannaichean’s craggy west face rises on the right side of the track. WirebridgeAt the point where the track veers to the left we crossed the Allt, by the wire bridge (Frank) and by wading the rivulet (me), and then hit the well-engineered path leading up to the Beallach Bhearnais. This was a pleasant climb. Below the col we felt the effect of the wind which was really quite strong, coming from south-westerly directions. We donned all the gear we had to protect us from the wind chill. From the Beallach Bhearnais we plodded and scrambled up the west ridge of Frank’s last two-digit munro – his 99th – Sgurr Choinnch. On the climb we paused and took in the views of Cheesecake and Lurgh Mhor: two hills requiring considerably more effort than the present tour. They looked nice though. We’ll be back (Austrian accent :-)).

At the summit we ate our lunch sitting on some grassy ledges on the north side of the hill which provided some respite from the wind. Photos, tea, sandwiches. And on to […]

2017-09-19T14:17:50+00:00May 21st, 2007|2007, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Carn nan Gobhar

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr na Lapaich

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+00:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

An Riabhachan

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+00:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

An Socach

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+00:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic.

From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image. From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack. Then we descended the north-western ridge of […]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+00:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|