Sron a’Choire Ghairbh

The second hike of 2016 was scheduled for a set of two Munros which I had visited twice before on each occasion bagging one of them. I had climbed one with Alex (Sron) and the other one with Mike (Meall). Today Frank and I were to combine them in one hike from the Cam Bealach (or at least Frank had to combine them since he still needed the ticks in his list).

From the parking just before the farm in Kilfinnan we followed the usual approach on the forest road, passing a few holiday homes or huts and then took the upper branch of the road through the dense fir plantation. It was an overcast day and occasionally a few drops of rain fell from the clouds. When three or three and a half kilometres were behind us we left the road took the good path branching off to the right and started the climb beside the Allt Glas-Dhoire. This path is steep at first but soon after you leave the forest the gradient eases. The continuation up the Cam Bhealach is quite scenic since both Sean Mheall to the north and Beall Dubh to the south of the glen hold interest for the wandering eye with their rocky faces and gullies. We made good progress and after maybe six kilometres were covered we reached the bealach between the two hills.

Here I decided that one Munro would be enough for today (no summit views) and Frank set of towards Sron aíChoire Ghairbh climbing the very well-engineered stalkers (?) path which leads almost all the way to the summit ridge and level summit of the Munro. I lay down in a comfortable spot close to the bealach and dozed for maybe 40 minutes. Then another walker reached the bealach also from the Loch Lochy side and […]

2017-09-19T14:14:58+00:00June 11th, 2016|2005, 2016, 2017 - 2010, Loch Eil to Glen Shiel|

Gleouraich

2005 Gleouraich and Spidean Mialach had been high on my list of mountains I wanted to do ever since Frank had told me about his winter walk on Gleouraich. But then, such additional motivation would not really have been necessary given the beautiful scenery these two hills are set in. I had once been to Glen Quoich when we walked Ladhar Beinn from Kinloch Hourn. Now, on a windy morning in May, we returned to walk Gleouraich and Spidean Mialach. We started our tour of the two hills’ corries at the small parking close to the Allt Coire Peitireach. We took the stalkers path which for a few dozens of metres stays close to the burn and then turns west to climb the ridge of Sròn a’Chuilinn. The path zig-zags very nicely and after some intermediate steps in the ridge reaches a level section where the ridge’s western flank drops off very steeply right down to the northern arm of Loch Quoich. The wind was quite strong here and the wind chill made my face hurt. At the end of this south-north ridge at a point where it turns west to join the main ridge of Gleouraich we paused and had some sandwiches. We waited – sheltered by some rocks that had a memorial plaque fixed to them – until the snow shower subsided and we could continue up the final rise of about 200m in the ridge leading to the summit of Gleouraich. Before the path starts to climb it passes a well constructed hunters’ shelter. After another 20 minutes we reached the summit of Munro No. 1. The relative calm at Geouraich’s summit contrasted starkly with the very windy conditions encountererd on the lower slopes. Pausing at the summit cairn some photo opportunities arose while we had a few cups of tea […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 6th, 2005|1997, 2005, 2009 - 2000, Loch Eil to Glen Shiel|

Spidean Mialach

Gleouraich and Spidean Mialach had been high on my list of mountains I wanted to do ever since Frank had told me about his winter walk on Gleouraich. But then, such additional motivation would not really have been necessary given the beautiful scenery these two hills are set in. I had once been to Glen Quoich when we walked Ladhar Beinn from Kinloch Hourn. Now, on a windy morning in May, we returned to walk Gleouraich and Spidean Mialach. We started our tour of the two hills’ corries at the small parking close to the Allt Coire Peitireach. We took the stalkers path which for a few dozens of metres stays close to the burn and then turns west to climb the ridge of Sròn a’Chuilinn. The path zig-zags very nicely and after some intermediate steps in the ridge reaches a level section where the ridge’s western flank drops off very steeply right down to the northern arm of Loch Quoich. The wind was quite strong here and the wind chill made my face hurt. At the end of this south-north ridge at a point where it turns west to join the main ridge of Gleouraich we paused and had some sandwiches. We waited – sheltered by some rocks that had a memorial plaque fixed to them – until the snow shower subsided and we could continue up the final rise of about 200m in the ridge leading to the summit of Gleouraich. Before the path starts to climb it passes a well constructed hunters’ shelter. After another 20 minutes we reached the summit of Munro No. 1. The relative calm at Geouraich’s summit contrasted starkly with the very windy conditions encountererd on the lower slopes. Pausing at the summit cairn some photo opportunities arose while we had a few cups of tea and […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 5th, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Loch Eil to Glen Shiel|

Aonach Beag

For the third year in row we embarked on a walk starting in Glen Nevis. From the car park we walked to the Steall ruin and to the bridge over the Allt Coire Giubhsachan. From there we followed the path up the south-west ridge of Sgurr a’Bhuic. Climbing steadily we gained height quickly. Then we lost the path.

We were on the south-westerly side of the ridge and had to climb very steep grass slopes to reach the final steepening of the south-west ridge of Sgurr a’Bhuic 150 m below the summit. The cairn of this fine hill is perched at the edge of a long vertical drop. There were new and interesting angles on Ben Nevis to be seen from there. Before continuing onward to Stob Coire Bhealaich we took a break to eat a snack and to take in the views of the Grey Corries and Sgurr Choinnich Mor. On the ridge leading to the summit of Stob Coire Bhealaich the east face of Aonach Beag dominated the view ahead. There still were some cornices left and there was still plenty of snow in the gullies and even on the plateau.

From Stob Coire Bhealaich we continued on the path and climbed the broad south-east shoulder of Aonach Beag. It was quite windy on the plateau so we did not stay at the cairn for long. The descent to the bealach between the small ridge and the big ridge did not take long. From the col we followed the path to the massive cairn of Aonach Beag where we paused for a while. As forecast, the wind picked up and the air got considerably colder. Soon conditions became quite uncomfortable on the plateau and we headed for the west ridge of Aonach Mor. The path on this ridge is sandy, gravelly and […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 4th, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Loch Linnhe to Loch Ericht|

Aonach Mor

2005 For the third year in row we embarked on a walk starting in Glen Nevis. From the car park we walked to the Steall ruin and to the bridge over the Allt Coire Giubhsachan. From there we followed the path up the south-west ridge of Sgurr a’Bhuic. Climbing steadily we gained height quickly. Then we lost the path.

We were on the south-westerly side of the ridge and had to climb very steep grass slopes to reach the final steepening of the south-west ridge of Sgurr a’Bhuic 150 m below the summit. The cairn of this fine hill is perched at the edge of a long vertical drop. There were new and interesting angles on Ben Nevis to be seen from there. Before continuing onward to Stob Coire Bhealaich we took a break to eat a snack and to take in the views of the Grey Corries and Sgurr Choinnich Mor. On the ridge leading to the summit of Stob Coire Bhealaich the east face of Aonach Beag dominated the view ahead. There still were some cornices left and there was still plenty of snow in the gullies and even on the plateau.

From Stob Coire Bhealaich we continued on the path and climbed the broad south-east shoulder of Aonach Beag. It was quite windy on the plateau so we did not stay at the cairn for long. The descent to the bealach between the small ridge and the big ridge did not take long. From the col we followed the path to the massive cairn of Aonach Beag where we paused for a while. As forecast, the wind picked up and the air got considerably colder. Soon conditions became quite uncomfortable on the plateau and we headed for the west ridge of Aonach Mor. The path on this ridge is sandy, gravelly […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 4th, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Loch Linnhe to Loch Ericht|

Beinn Teallach

The two hills closest to our cottage had to be climbed this holiday. Beinn Teallach having the reputation of being a rather dull hill and Beinn a’Chaorainn being renowned for featuring nice cornices in winter and for carrying with it a longish dispute as to which of its summits really is the highest one. As the books propose, we started out from the A86 at the parking close to the bridge over Roughburn. We walked up the forrest road, turned left at a junction and left the road at a firebreak. From here onwards the terrain was very boggy until we reached the stile which straddles the fence separating the plantation from the open hillside. From the stile we followed the footpath that first contours around Meall Clachaig and then gradually gains height until it peters out on the easy south-western slopes of Beinn a’Chaorainn. The wind picked up when we reached an altitude of about 900m so we had to put on our raingear. Soon after we reached the cloud base we also reached the main ridge of the hill somewhere between the south top and the central summit of the hill. The cornices which form at the rim of the eastern corries in winter were still very much present. Soon we reached the central summit of the hill. We touched the cairn and carried on. Visibility was very modest and as soon as we reached the north top we headed north-west to the bealach between the two hills. When we dropped below the clouds we sat down at a reasonably sheltered place, ate our sandwiches and drank some hot tea. Then we headed down to the bealach and the massive cairn which sits on it. At the cairn Alex decided to call it a day and to walk back on the path […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 3rd, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Beinn a’Chaorainn

The two hills closest to our cottage had to be climbed this holiday. Beinn Teallach having the reputation of being a rather dull hill and Beinn a’Chaorainn being renowned for featuring nice cornices in winter and for carrying with it a longish dispute as to which of its summits really is the highest one.

As the books propose, we started out from the A86 at the parking close to the bridge over Roughburn. We walked up the forrest road, turned left at a junction and left the road at a firebreak. From here onwards the terrain was very boggy until we reached the stile which straddles the fence separating the plantation from the open hillside. From the stile we followed the footpath that first contours around Meall Clachaig and then gradually gains height until it peters out on the easy south-western slopes of Beinn a’Chaorainn. The wind picked up when we reached an altitude of about 900m so we had to put on our raingear.

Soon after we reached the cloud base we also reached the main ridge of the hill somewhere between the south top and the central summit of the hill. The cornices which form at the rim of the eastern corries in winter were still very much present. Soon we reached the central summit of the hill. We touched the cairn and carried on. Visibility was very modest and as soon as we reached the north top we headed north-west to the bealach between the two hills. When we dropped below the clouds we sat down at a reasonably sheltered place, ate our sandwiches and drank some hot tea. Then we headed down to the bealach and the massive cairn which sits on it.

At the cairn Alex decided to call it a day and to walk back on the path along the Allt […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 3rd, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Glen Roy to the Monadhliath|

Sgurr Fhuaran

The Five Sisters had been on our mind for more than ten years. Conditions had never allowed us to do the tramp of these hills but finally the day had arrived. We had two cars available so transport was no problem. We left one car in a lay-by at the A87 close to Loch Shiel where a footbridge facilitates the crossing of the River Shiel on returning from the walk. From there we drove back up the glen to the roadside parking where the path to the Bealach an Lapain commences. We parked the second car and headed up the steep path leading to the bealach 600m above. On the lower slopes the path has several branches which merge further up the hill.

Making good progress we reached the col after about an hour and ten minutes. The wind at the bealach was cold and we all donned our wind-proof gear. From Bealach an Lapain we headed west in thick clouds traversing the many knolls on the ridge to Sgurr nan Spainteach. It took us quite a while to get to this first top, but finally we reached the summit cairn. Just when we set off to continue to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe the clouds broke and we could take in the whole North Glen Shiel Ridge including our three munros of today. After having taken off our raingear we continued onward to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe. The ridge has a rocky section which makes for some light scrambling. The final rise to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe was interesting since we crossed rests of winter snow fields and negotiated some rocks. At the summit we paused for a snack and drank some water.

Then the descent to the col below and the climb to the second munro, Sgurr na Carnach, followed. All this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:54+00:00May 2nd, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe

The Five Sisters had been on our mind for more than ten years. Conditions had never allowed us to do the tramp of these hills but finally the day had arrived. We had two cars available so transport was no problem. We left one car in a lay-by at the A87 close to Loch Shiel where a footbridge facilitates the crossing of the River Shiel on returning from the walk. From there we drove back up the glen to the roadside parking where the path to the Bealach an Lapain commences. We parked the second car and headed up the steep path leading to the bealach 600m above. On the lower slopes the path has several branches which merge further up the hill. Making good progress we reached the col after about an hour and ten minutes. The wind at the bealach was cold and we all donned our wind-proof gear. From Bealach an Lapain we headed west in thick clouds traversing the many knolls on the ridge to Sgurr nan Spainteach. It took us quite a while to get to this first top, but finally we reached the summit cairn. Just when we set off to continue to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe the clouds broke and we could take in the whole North Glen Shiel Ridge including our three munros of today. After having taken off our raingear we continued onward to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe. The ridge has a rocky section which makes for some light scrambling. The final rise to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe was interesting since we crossed rests of winter snow fields and negotiated some rocks. At the summit we paused for a snack and drank some water. Then the descent to the col below and the climb to the second munro, Sgurr na Carnach, followed. All this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:54+00:00May 2nd, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Sgurr na Carnach

The Five Sisters had been on our mind for more than ten years. Conditions had never allowed us to do the tramp of these hills but finally the day had arrived. We had two cars available so transport was no problem.

We left one car in a lay-by at the A87 close to Loch Shiel where a footbridge facilitates the crossing of the River Shiel on returning from the walk. From there we drove back up the glen to the roadside parking where the path to the Bealach an Lapain commences. We parked the second car and headed up the steep path leading to the bealach 600m above. On the lower slopes the path has several branches which merge further up the hill.

Making good progress we reached the col after about an hour and ten minutes. The wind at the bealach was cold and we all donned our wind-proof gear. From Bealach an Lapain we headed west in thick clouds traversing the many knolls on the ridge to Sgurr nan Spainteach. It took us quite a while to get to this first top, but finally we reached the summit cairn. Just when we set off to continue to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe the clouds broke and we could take in the whole North Glen Shiel Ridge including our three munros of today. After having taken off our raingear we continued onward to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe.

The ridge has a rocky section which makes for some light scrambling. The final rise to Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe was interesting since we crossed rests of winter snow fields and negotiated some rocks. At the summit we paused for a snack and drank some water. Then the descent to the col below and the climb to the second munro, Sgurr na Carnach, followed. All this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:54+00:00May 2nd, 2005|2005, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|