Geal-charn

Since Cord took this well earned day off i used the opportunity to fill in this Munro which i had not ticked yet (Cord bagged it in 2002 together with Mike). So he dropped me off at the car park at Balsporran Cottage and headed off to Aviemore to do some shopping of forgotten items. That was not a nice surrounding at all. In front of me a scarmarked bump. Behind me the A9 with it’s traffic and the new pylons. So i stormed over the rails and instantly chose the wrong track up the hill. After a short crossing i reached the right track and now it was a straightforward ascent to the 3009ft hill. I thought there was no other accuse than just it’s height and the Munro status. But i was proven wrong since the views from the west side of the summit were really nice towards Ben Alder and down the long stretched Loch Ericht. I contemplated the track along the shore which we had cycled 4 times over the weekend – my legs still arching from that memory (and certainly Cords too). The weather was not too bad. I took my 10 minutes to eat, stroll around and take pictures before i hurried down. Some 15 minutes from the A9 away i saw how Cord entered the car park. Just in time for dropping my rucksack in and drive to our cottage for getting a nice warm meal. A first in over 20 years munrobagging. And then off to Carn Liath.

 

2002 Parking by the A9 two or three kilometres north of the Pass of Drumochter we crossed the railway at the Balsporran B&B heading for the north-east ridge of Geal-charn. All the glens were filled with morning fog and clouds. Even though there had been a […]

2017-09-19T14:15:01+00:00June 2nd, 2014|2002, 2014, 2017 - 2010, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

Meall Chuaich

The first day of the 2013 hillwalking season saw us driving from Edinburgh to Aviemore. We had decided to bag Meall Chuaich en route. So a few hours after having disembarked the plane in Edinburgh we parked our car at the roadside on the A9 close to Cuaich Farm.

Frank and I unpacked our suitcases and packed our rucksacks for an easy afternoon hike. From the parking we walked a Landrover track towards the aqueduct. Once on the track beside the concrete trough of the aqueduct we turned due east towards the hill of the day. Two kilometres onwards we reached the small dam at the hydroelectricity building. We continued along the Landrover track beside the Allt Cuaich. A few hundred metres before getting to Loch Cuaich we veered right into the glen of the Allt Coire Chuaich. Soon the west ridge of Meall Chuaich was reached and we climbed the well-defined path up this whaleback ridge of the hill. Some slightly boggy sections at the foot of the ridge were soon left behind. The climb was quite regular and the slope was more or less uniform, grass giving way to more rocky sections. Then the slope levelled off and we reached the summit plateau of Meall Chuaich.

A few minutes on we touched the cairn of the Munro. The weather being fine the views in all directions were very good. We basked in the sunshine and had a few sips of water. Soon, however, we had to retrace our steps towards the A9 since the afternoon was drawing to a close. After barely three and a half hours we were back at our car and drove towards Aviemore our resting place for the night.

Meall Chuaich proved to be the gentle hill expected. This afternoon bathed in bright sunshine was a very good start to the […]

2017-09-19T14:15:04+00:00May 17th, 2013|2013, 2017 - 2010, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

Carn na Caim

The last two munros of the May 2006 hill-walking holiday were A’Bhuidheanach Bheag and Carn na Caim. Conveniently situated close to the A9 we chose these two to easily bag another pair of hills on our way back south. We reached the foot of the hills at the same time as another ten people who – as it soon transpired – participated in a guided walk which formed part of the Aviemore hill-walking Festival 2006. We used the landrover track which leads up the hill in a southeasterly direction. After some bends it heads up fairly steeply until it reaches the site of a disused quarry. The white quartzite found here no doubt was used for covering garden paths and patios. Soon the col between the two munros was gained and we turned north to bag Carn na Caim first. There is a distinct scar in the broad grassy and mossy ridge which allows the hill-waker to find the hill’s summit cairn without any difficulty even in the thickest of fogs. The wind was lively and coming from the north it gave us red noses for refreshment on this otherwise uninspiring tramp. The views to the east over undulating brown hills were dull and we were glad to reach the summit and pause a little. Then we turned on our heels and headed back to the col from where we followed the track in a southerly direction. At A’Bhuidheanach we dropped to another col from which the Allt Coire Chùirn flows west. On the other side we climbed the final 100m and walked up to the cairn of A’Bhuidheanach Bheag. Another, longer pause with considerably better views than from Carn na Caim – especially of the hills in the south and west – followed. Finally we retraced our steps to the col between the […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 13th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

A’Bhuidheanach Bheag

The last two munros of the May 2006 hill-walking holiday were A’Bhuidheanach Bheag and Carn na Caim. Conveniently situated close to the A9 we chose these two to easily bag another pair of hills on our way back south. We reached the foot of the hills at the same time as another ten people who – as it soon transpired – participated in a guided walk which formed part of the Aviemore hill-walking Festival 2006. We used the landrover track which leads up the hill in a southeasterly direction. After some bends it heads up fairly steeply until it reaches the site of a disused quarry. The white quartzite found here no doubt was used for covering garden paths and patios. Soon the col between the two munros was gained and we turned north to bag Carn na Caim first. There is a distinct scar in the broad grassy and mossy ridge which allows the hill-waker to find the hill’s summit cairn without any difficulty even in the thickest of fogs. The wind was lively and coming from the north it gave us red noses for refreshment on this otherwise uninspiring tramp. The views to the east over undulating brown hills were dull and we were glad to reach the summit and pause a little. Then we turned on our heels and headed back to the col from where we followed the track in a southerly direction. At A’Bhuidheanach we dropped to another col from which the Allt Coire Chùirn flows west. On the other side we climbed the final 100m and walked up to the cairn of A’Bhuidheanach Bheag. Another, longer pause with considerably better views than from Carn na Caim – especially of the hills in the south and west – followed. Finally we retraced our steps to the col between the […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 13th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

Beinn Udlamain

The first day of the 2006 walking holiday had seen Alex, Frank and me stomp up and down Shiehallion in three hours. The second tour of three of the western Drumochter Hills was squeezed into the transfer day from Perthshire to Glen Strathfarrar where our chalet was. Starting the hike at the beginning of the landrover track into Coire Dhomhain we walked up this glen with the Sow of Atholl to the left and the Boar of Badenoch to the right. After two kilometres we left the track, crossed the Allt Coire Dhomhain and headed for the bealach between the Sow and Sgairneach Mhor. The going was easy over grassy and mossy terrain which was not too wet. Fine conditions. Soon we reached the bealach and continued due west along the rim of Corrie Creagach. The remains of massive cornices were still there and the arching corrie rim was a beautiful sight. Then we attained the summit of Sgairneach Mhor. Off we went over the grassy plateu to the very head of Coire Dhomhain and the foot of Carn ‘Ic Loumhaidh which we climbed to get onto the ridge leading to the highest hill of the tramp, Beinn Udlamain at 1011 m. At Beinn Udlamain’s summit we met another group of hill walkers and we all huddled close by the cairn searching shelter from the strong wind. From Beinn Udlamain we set out on the three kilometre stretch of ridge leading to A’ Mharconaich skirting around Fraoch-Choire. After 35 or 40 minutes we arrived at the summit cairn of the third munro of the day which I had visited in autumn 2002 already. From there we descended steep slopes of grass and snow in a south easterly direction back into Coire Dhomhain where we hit the landrover track and walked back to the A9 […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 6th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

Sgairneach Mhor

The first day of the 2006 walking holiday had seen Alex, Frank and me stomp up and down Shiehallion in three hours. The second tour of three of the western Drumochter Hills was squeezed into the transfer day from Perthshire to Glen Strathfarrar where our chalet was. Starting the hike at the beginning of the landrover track into Coire Dhomhain we walked up this glen with the Sow of Atholl to the left and the Boar of Badenoch to the right. After two kilometres we left the track, crossed the Allt Coire Dhomhain and headed for the bealach between the Sow and Sgairneach Mhor. The going was easy over grassy and mossy terrain which was not too wet. Fine conditions. Soon we reached the bealach and continued due west along the rim of Corrie Creagach. The remains of massive cornices were still there and the arching corrie rim was a beautiful sight. Then we attained the summit of Sgairneach Mhor. Off we went over the grassy plateu to the very head of Coire Dhomhain and the foot of Carn ‘Ic Loumhaidh which we climbed to get onto the ridge leading to the highest hill of the tramp, Beinn Udlamain at 1011 m. At Beinn Udlamain’s summit we met another group of hill walkers and we all huddled close by the cairn searching shelter from the strong wind. From Beinn Udlamain we set out on the three kilometre stretch of ridge leading to A’ Mharconaich skirting around Fraoch-Choire. After 35 or 40 minutes we arrived at the summit cairn of the third munro of the day which I had visited in autumn 2002 already. From there we descended steep slopes of grass and snow in a south easterly direction back into Coire Dhomhain where we hit the landrover track and walked back to the A9 […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 6th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

A’Mharconaich

2006 The first day of the 2006 walking holiday had seen Alex, Frank and me stomp up and down Shiehallion in three hours. The second tour of three of the western Drumochter Hills was squeezed into the transfer day from Perthshire to Glen Strathfarrar where our chalet was. Starting the hike at the beginning of the landrover track into Coire Dhomhain we walked up this glen with the Sow of Atholl to the left and the Boar of Badenoch to the right. After two kilometres we left the track, crossed the Allt Coire Dhomhain and headed for the bealach between the Sow and Sgairneach Mhor. The going was easy over grassy and mossy terrain which was not too wet. Fine conditions. Soon we reached the bealach and continued due west along the rim of Corrie Creagach. The remains of massive cornices were still there and the arching corrie rim was a beautiful sight. Then we attained the summit of Sgairneach Mhor. Off we went over the grassy plateu to the very head of Coire Dhomhain and the foot of Carn ‘Ic Loumhaidh which we climbed to get onto the ridge leading to the highest hill of the tramp, Beinn Udlamain at 1011 m. At Beinn Udlamain’s summit we met another group of hill walkers and we all huddled close by the cairn searching shelter from the strong wind. From Beinn Udlamain we set out on the three kilometre stretch of ridge leading to A’ Mharconaich skirting around Fraoch-Choire. After 35 or 40 minutes we arrived at the summit cairn of the third munro of the day which I had visited in autumn 2002 already. From there we descended steep slopes of grass and snow in a south easterly direction back into Coire Dhomhain where we hit the landrover track and walked back to the […]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+00:00May 6th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|