Maol Chean-dearg

The last hill tour of the 2015 “campaign” was the bare red headed hill of the Ben Damph / Coulin Forrest. Frank and I parked the Volvo at the lochside layby in Annat. While getting our things together we were joined by a mountain biker who also wanted to head for Maol Chean-dearg. We chatted a bit and after some “see you later” we set off behind him.

I (Cord) had already climbed Maol Chean-dearg from Annat in 2000 so the good path on gravel and over slabby terrain was kind of familiar. It climbs to an altitude of about 300m and then levels off when it reaches the flat terrain characterized by slabs, sand and two or three small lochans lying between Beinn na h-Eaglaise and Meall Dearg. Having passed Lochan Domhain we soon came to the banks of Loch an Eion. From there the north face of Maol Chean-dearg was quite an impressive view both ahead and also as reflected in the loch.

Again as I had done in 2000 we took the right-hand fork and followed the path around the west and later south flank of the hill towards the beallach between Maol Chean-dearg and An Ruadh Stac. This path rises steadily and more or less gently towards Loch Coire an Ruadh Stac and further on to a small round lochan with whitish quartzite walls that nestles nicely between the two hills. Here we again met “our” mountain biker who had embarked on the trip back to the car.

At the 590m beallach we had our second break of the walk and ate sandwiches basking in the sunshine. We left our rucksacks at the beallach and started the stiff climb up the steep 150m of the ridge consisting of quartzite and quartzite scree. From my memory I knew that a more level section would […]

2017-09-19T14:14:58+00:00May 1st, 2015|2000, 2015, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Beinn Sgulaird

I had driven past this Munro many times in the almost 20 years I’ve been visiting Scotland for hillwalking. Most of the books don’t consider this hill as something special: A long bumpy ridge and some rocks in the summit region. Ralph Storer, however, gives the hill due respect in his book “The Ultimate Guide to the Munros”.

Druimavuic House at the end of Loch Creran is situated in a very nice garden and can be visited. We parked our car in a layby to the north of the house. From the parking we followed the forrest track past the perimeter drystane wall of Druimavouc house into the woods. The path climbs steeply and after about 100m it reaches the open hillside. It continues steeply. When it levels off a cairn marks the start of the path up the long west ridge of Beinn Sgulaird. The climb to point 488m is pleasant and height is gained quickly. Looking back on Loch Creran we took a short break to catch some breath.

Then we skirted the summit of point 488m and walked down the steep path into the cut before the next rise. From this beallach the track climbs steeply onto a broad grassy ridge which after another about 400m leads to point 863. This stretch of the climb takes its time but is an easy hike on a gradually rising ridge. At the top of point 863 the first rocks appear. The next three kilometres to the summit of Beinn Sgulaird lead over increasingly rocky or broken terrain. Level sections take turns with several steep descents and re-ascents – a very interesting and totally different terrain when compared to the first 90 minutes of the climb. Easy to moderate scrambling options were available in abundance. Very nice! At the summit we took a break and enjoyed […]

2017-09-19T14:16:13+00:00May 4th, 2012|2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Beinn Fhionnlaidh

These are two hills which receive not too much attention and are sort of off the beaten track. The weather being good we stuck to our plan of climbing Sgurr na-h Ulaidh and Beinn Fhionnlaidh together in one outing. The day before we had climbed the Glen Etive Five (Ben Starav to Meall nan Eun) and we still felt quite exhausted after that 35km, 2400m and 12 hours trip. As seems most economical when climbing both hills in one go we started the hike from Invercharnan in Glen Etive.

The walk through the forest was nice in so far as the trees provided for some shade against the morning sun. But it was no exactly scenic since a lot of road construction and tree felling had been and still was going on. After about 45 minutes we reached the upper perimeter of the forest and walked into the wide open corrie between the slopes of Meall nan Gobhar and Meall a’Bhuiridh, both foothills of their respective Munros. We headed up the corrie in a northerly direction following an indistinct track and traces of footpaths. After a kilometre and a half we headed up to the col between Meall a’Bhuiridh and the foot of the south-east ridge of Sgurr na-h Ulaidh. This part of the walk was quite interesting since grass gave way to slabs and vice versa. At the foot of Sgurr na-h Ulaidh’s south-east ridge we took a short break before we tackled this rather steep way of ascent – but there is no easy-angled up this hill anyway. There were outcrops and sections of grass which together form several steps in the ridge. This made for an interesting and entertaining climb. There are remnants of an old fence which can be a guide in bad weather but we did not need any artificial […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00May 2nd, 2012|2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Sgor na h-Ulaidh

These are two hills which receive not too much attention and are sort of off the beaten track. The weather being good we stuck to our plan of climbing Sgurr na-h Ulaidh and Beinn Fhionnlaidh together in one outing. The day before we had climbed the Glen Etive Five (Ben Starav to Meall nan Eun) and we still felt quite exhausted after that 35km, 2400m and 12 hours trip. As seems most economical when climbing both hills in one go we started the hike from Invercharnan in Glen Etive.

The walk through the forest was nice in so far as the trees provided for some shade against the morning sun. But it was no exactly scenic since a lot of road construction and tree felling had been and still was going on. After about 45 minutes we reached the upper perimeter of the forest and walked into the wide open corrie between the slopes of Meall nan Gobhar and Meall a’Bhuiridh, both foothills of their respective Munros. We headed up the corrie in a northerly direction following an indistinct track and traces of footpaths. After a kilometre and a half we headed up to the col between Meall a’Bhuiridh and the foot of the south-east ridge of Sgurr na-h Ulaidh. This part of the walk was quite interesting since grass gave way to slabs and vice versa. At the foot of Sgurr na-h Ulaidh’s south-east ridge we took a short break before we tackled this rather steep way of ascent – but there is no easy-angled up this hill anyway. There were outcrops and sections of grass which together form several steps in the ridge. This made for an interesting and entertaining climb. There are remnants of an old fence which can be a guide in bad weather but we did not need any artificial […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00May 2nd, 2012|2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Meall nan Eun

Only few places in Scottish hillwalking evoke such unanimous feelings of wonder and marvel as does Glen Etive. Glen Coe is grand. Glen Shiel has its looong South and North Ridges. Glen Torridon is second to none and the upper Glen of the River Dee is a class of its own. Yet, Glen Etive has its own very special character of remoteness and loveliness. And it harbours one of the great one-day tours of the Highlands: The round of the Glen Etive Five: Ben Starav, Beinn nan Aighenan, Glas Bheinn Mhor, Stob Coir an Albannaich and Meall nan Eun.

Doing all of these in one go had become a minor obsession of Frank’s and me since we first read of the idea which is mentioned in Ralph Storer’s “The Ultimate Guide to the Munros – Volume 2: Central Highlands South”. Of course we did not need Mr Storer’s benediction to set about doing this great round but it helped that he mentioned this as a slightly silly extension to an extension to an extension of a great day in Glen Etive.

So hell-bent as we were we left out car at the lay-by of the Glen Etive single track road, crossed the River Etive by the bridge provided and reached Coileitir in no time at all. From there we followed the path across the boggy grass to the Allt Mheuran which we crossed and then followed the path up this burn to the foot of Ben Starav’s famous north ridge. Me having bagged Ben Starav in early spring 2001 at the time of Foot-and-Mouth Disease I opted to skip this beautiful hill. So Frank and I said Good-bye to each other. Frank continued up the great north ridge of Ben Starav. We had shaken hands that we’d meet later in the day and do four of […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00May 1st, 2012|2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Beinn nan Aighenan

Only few places in Scottish hillwalking evoke such unanimous feelings of wonder and marvel as does Glen Etive. Glen Coe is grand. Glen Shiel has its looong South and North Ridges. Glen Torridon is second to none and the upper Glen of the River Dee is a class of its own. Yet, Glen Etive has its own very special character of remoteness and loveliness. And it harbours one of the great one-day tours of the Highlands: The round of the Glen Etive Five: Ben Starav, Beinn nan Aighenan, Glas Bheinn Mhor, Stob Coir an Albannaich and Meall nan Eun.

Doing all of these in one go had become a minor obsession of Frank’s and me since we first read of the idea which is mentioned in Ralph Storer’s “The Ultimate Guide to the Munros – Volume 2: Central Highlands South”. Of course we did not need Mr Storer’s benediction to set about doing this great round but it helped that he mentioned this as a slightly silly extension to an extension to an extension of a great day in Glen Etive.

So hell-bent as we were we left out car at the lay-by of the Glen Etive single track road, crossed the River Etive by the bridge provided and reached Coileitir in no time at all. From there we followed the path across the boggy grass to the Allt Mheuran which we crossed and then followed the path up this burn to the foot of Ben Starav’s famous north ridge. Me having bagged Ben Starav in early spring 2001 at the time of Foot-and-Mouth Disease I opted to skip this beautiful hill. So Frank and I said Good-bye to each other. Frank continued up the great north ridge of Ben Starav. We had shaken hands that we’d meet later in the day and do four of […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00May 1st, 2012|2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Glas Bheinn Mhor

Only few places in Scottish hillwalking evoke such unanimous feelings of wonder and marvel as does Glen Etive. Glen Coe is grand. Glen Shiel has its looong South and North Ridges. Glen Torridon is second to none and the upper Glen of the River Dee is a class of its own. Yet, Glen Etive has its own very special character of remoteness and loveliness. And it harbours one of the great one-day tours of the Highlands: The round of the Glen Etive Five: Ben Starav, Beinn nan Aighenan, Glas Bheinn Mhor, Stob Coir an Albannaich and Meall nan Eun.

Doing all of these in one go had become a minor obsession of Frank’s and me since we first read of the idea which is mentioned in Ralph Storer’s “The Ultimate Guide to the Munros – Volume 2: Central Highlands South”. Of course we did not need Mr Storer’s benediction to set about doing this great round but it helped that he mentioned this as a slightly silly extension to an extension to an extension of a great day in Glen Etive.

So hell-bent as we were we left out car at the lay-by of the Glen Etive single track road, crossed the River Etive by the bridge provided and reached Coileitir in no time at all. From there we followed the path across the boggy grass to the Allt Mheuran which we crossed and then followed the path up this burn to the foot of Ben Starav’s famous north ridge. Me having bagged Ben Starav in early spring 2001 at the time of Foot-and-Mouth Disease I opted to skip this beautiful hill. So Frank and I said Good-bye to each other. Frank continued up the great north ridge of Ben Starav. We had shaken hands that we’d meet later in the day and do four of […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00May 1st, 2012|2001, 2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Stob Coir’an Albannaich

Only few places in Scottish hillwalking evoke such unanimous feelings of wonder and marvel as does Glen Etive. Glen Coe is grand. Glen Shiel has its looong South and North Ridges. Glen Torridon is second to none and the upper Glen of the River Dee is a class of its own. Yet, Glen Etive has its own very special character of remoteness and loveliness. And it harbours one of the great one-day tours of the Highlands: The round of the Glen Etive Five: Ben Starav, Beinn nan Aighenan, Glas Bheinn Mhor, Stob Coir an Albannaich and Meall nan Eun.

Doing all of these in one go had become a minor obsession of Frank’s and me since we first read of the idea which is mentioned in Ralph Storer’s “The Ultimate Guide to the Munros – Volume 2: Central Highlands South”. Of course we did not need Mr Storer’s benediction to set about doing this great round but it helped that he mentioned this as a slightly silly extension to an extension to an extension of a great day in Glen Etive.

So hell-bent as we were we left out car at the lay-by of the Glen Etive single track road, crossed the River Etive by the bridge provided and reached Coileitir in no time at all. From there we followed the path across the boggy grass to the Allt Mheuran which we crossed and then followed the path up this burn to the foot of Ben Starav’s famous north ridge. Me having bagged Ben Starav in early spring 2001 at the time of Foot-and-Mouth Disease I opted to skip this beautiful hill. So Frank and I said Good-bye to each other. Frank continued up the great north ridge of Ben Starav. We had shaken hands that we’d meet later in the day and do four of […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00May 1st, 2012|2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Ben Starav

Only few places in Scottish hillwalking evoke such unanimous feelings of wonder and marvel as does Glen Etive. Glen Coe is grand. Glen Shiel has its looong South and North Ridges. Glen Torridon is second to none and the upper Glen of the River Dee is a class of its own. Yet, Glen Etive has its own very special character of remoteness and loveliness. And it harbours one of the great one-day tours of the Highlands: The round of the Glen Etive Five: Ben Starav, Beinn nan Aighenan, Glas Bheinn Mhor, Stob Coir an Albannaich and Meall nan Eun.

Doing all of these in one go had become a minor obsession of Frank’s and me since we first read of the idea which is mentioned in Ralph Storer’s “The Ultimate Guide to the Munros – Volume 2: Central Highlands South”. Of course we did not need Mr Storer’s benediction to set about doing this great round but it helped that he mentioned this as a slightly silly extension to an extension to an extension of a great day in Glen Etive.

So hell-bent as we were we left out car at the lay-by of the Glen Etive single track road, crossed the River Etive by the bridge provided and reached Coileitir in no time at all. From there we followed the path across the boggy grass to the Allt Mheuran which we crossed and then followed the path up this burn to the foot of Ben Starav’s famous north ridge. Me having bagged Ben Starav in early spring 2001 at the time of Foot-and-Mouth Disease I opted to skip this beautiful hill. So Frank and I said Good-bye to each other. Frank continued up the great north ridge of Ben Starav. We had shaken hands that we’d meet later in the day and do four of […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00May 1st, 2012|2001, 2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|

Stob Coire Raineach

2012 On the fourth day of our Scotland 2012 session and after some really great hikes like Creise and The Mamores Cord took his day off so i had the chance to bag Buachaille Etive Beag which he already had bagged some years ago. And it should be the only bad weather day of the complete 2012 session.

Cord drove me to the parking place at the A82 and we negotiated that he should be here 3 hours later again (a little too optimistic). I walked the very good path to the start of the ascent where the modest climbing began. After 30 minutes i reached the bealach which lay just below the clouds and i had some very interesting views of the Bidean ridges which were already covered in clouds. So i headed off to the first Munro of the day Stob Coire Raineach which i reached in no time and with no views which was a pity since it is such a good view point for Glen Coe. I took the mandatory summit picture and returned to the bealach to start the ascent to the next Munro Stob Dubh. This should be a more interesting and longer walking but you sense it: no views at all. At the ascent i met the only group of walkers (with crampons) of the day after a little mountain gossip we both headed our way. Since it was cold, wet and windy i just touched the cairn and returned. From the bealach it was an easy descent and since i was slightly overdue i sped up the last mile and reached the parking place where Cord was waiting – reading a newspaper in the car. All in all it was a good day and i bagged the last – real – Glen Coe Munros.

 

New Munro […]

2017-09-19T14:16:14+00:00April 30th, 2012|1998, 2012, 2017 - 2010, Strath Orchy to Loch Leven|