Carn na Caim

The last two munros of the May 2006 hill-walking holiday were A’Bhuidheanach Bheag and Carn na Caim. Conveniently situated close to the A9 we chose these two to easily bag another pair of hills on our way back south. We reached the foot of the hills at the same time as another ten people who – as it soon transpired – participated in a guided walk which formed part of the Aviemore hill-walking Festival 2006. We used the landrover track which leads up the hill in a southeasterly direction. After some bends it heads up fairly steeply until it reaches the site of a disused quarry. The white quartzite found here no doubt was used for covering garden paths and patios. Soon the col between the two munros was gained and we turned north to bag Carn na Caim first. There is a distinct scar in the broad grassy and mossy ridge which allows the hill-waker to find the hill’s summit cairn without any difficulty even in the thickest of fogs. The wind was lively and coming from the north it gave us red noses for refreshment on this otherwise uninspiring tramp. The views to the east over undulating brown hills were dull and we were glad to reach the summit and pause a little. Then we turned on our heels and headed back to the col from where we followed the track in a southerly direction. At A’Bhuidheanach we dropped to another col from which the Allt Coire Chùirn flows west. On the other side we climbed the final 100m and walked up to the cairn of A’Bhuidheanach Bheag. Another, longer pause with considerably better views than from Carn na Caim – especially of the hills in the south and west – followed. Finally we retraced our steps to the col between the […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 13th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

A’Bhuidheanach Bheag

The last two munros of the May 2006 hill-walking holiday were A’Bhuidheanach Bheag and Carn na Caim. Conveniently situated close to the A9 we chose these two to easily bag another pair of hills on our way back south. We reached the foot of the hills at the same time as another ten people who – as it soon transpired – participated in a guided walk which formed part of the Aviemore hill-walking Festival 2006. We used the landrover track which leads up the hill in a southeasterly direction. After some bends it heads up fairly steeply until it reaches the site of a disused quarry. The white quartzite found here no doubt was used for covering garden paths and patios. Soon the col between the two munros was gained and we turned north to bag Carn na Caim first. There is a distinct scar in the broad grassy and mossy ridge which allows the hill-waker to find the hill’s summit cairn without any difficulty even in the thickest of fogs. The wind was lively and coming from the north it gave us red noses for refreshment on this otherwise uninspiring tramp. The views to the east over undulating brown hills were dull and we were glad to reach the summit and pause a little. Then we turned on our heels and headed back to the col from where we followed the track in a southerly direction. At A’Bhuidheanach we dropped to another col from which the Allt Coire Chùirn flows west. On the other side we climbed the final 100m and walked up to the cairn of A’Bhuidheanach Bheag. Another, longer pause with considerably better views than from Carn na Caim – especially of the hills in the south and west – followed. Finally we retraced our steps to the col between the […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 13th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

Fionn Bheinn

Friday morning, 12 May 2006, having been a windy and wet affair we chose to climb this hill as a quick up-and-down-and-bag-it tour later that day. So, in the early afternoon we locked the car in front of Achnasheen’s railway station. After crossing the A832 we headed up the steep hillside beside the Allt Achadh na Sine to emerge on the flat boggy terrain strewn with peat hags which lies at the foot of the corrie formed by the slopes of Creagan nan Laogh and Fionn Bheinn. After having negotiated the peat and bog we soon climbed up the open southern side of Fionn Bheinn over easy but steepish grass. At the summit cairn we joined a group of English hillwalkers for whom Frank snapped a few photographs. Then we enjoyed the views. There is hardly any better viewpoint for the Great Wilderness, the Fannaichs, and perhaps for parts of the Torridon and Glen Carron hills too, than Fionn Bheinn. We were deeply impressed and played name-the-hill for quite a while. But then the cold wind got the better of us and we reluctantly headed back to Achnasheen by the way of ascent. What a pity that we had no camera with us on this walk! We should return to this hill on a crisp and clear winter day and snap photos like mad!

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 12th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Marree to Loch Broom|

An Socach

This tour to the remote hills at the western end of Glen Affric was one that gave us many interesting impressions. The beautiful woods in the eastern part of the glen, the marvellous loch and the lonely upper reaches around Alltbeithe Youth Hostel. We started our hike from the parking at the east end of Loch Affric where the two routes along the north and south side of the loch commence. We chose the southern approach since we used bicycles in order to make quicker progress on the long way to the foot of the hills. The land-rover track undulates about 50m above Loch Affric and the heavy rucksacks on our backs made themselves felt on every rise of the track. Driving downhill on the good track was fun, though.

Soon we reached the crossing of the River Affric at Athnamulloch. We pushed our bikes over the bridge and continued our bicycle tour. The surface of the track deteriorated considerably being now composed of gravel and small boulders which made things more exhausting. Then, when the Glen opened up and its floor became flatter, we saw the youth hostel in the distance. Once there, we paused for some sandwiches. We left our bicycles by the hostel and climbed the path beside the Allt na Faing into Coire na Cloiche. This was a very steady climb in a grassy corrie. Higher up in the corrie a steeper section followed but the going was easy. Soon the path delivered us on the beallach between the two munros. The views of Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan and Mullach na Dheiragain were impressive. But first we turned east and climbed the rigde to An Socach. The summit of this hill is only 30 minutes from the beallach and is easily gained. From the summit we retraced our steps and soon […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 11th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan

This tour to the remote hills at the western end of Glen Affric was one that gave us many interesting impressions. The beautiful woods in the eastern part of the glen, the marvellous loch and the lonely upper reaches around Alltbeithe Youth Hostel. We started our hike from the parking at the east end of Loch Affric where the two routes along the north and south side of the loch commence. We chose the southern approach since we used bicycles in order to make quicker progress on the long way to the foot of the hills. The land-rover track undulates about 50m above Loch Affric and the heavy rucksacks on our backs made themselves felt on every rise of the track. Driving downhill on the good track was fun, though.

Soon we reached the crossing of the River Affric at Athnamulloch. We pushed our bikes over the bridge and continued our bicycle tour. The surface of the track deteriorated considerably being now composed of gravel and small boulders which made things more exhausting. Then, when the Glen opened up and its floor became flatter, we saw the youth hostel in the distance. Once there, we paused for some sandwiches. We left our bicycles by the hostel and climbed the path beside the Allt na Faing into Coire na Cloiche. This was a very steady climb in a grassy corrie. Higher up in the corrie a steeper section followed but the going was easy. Soon the path delivered us on the beallach between the two munros. The views of Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan and Mullach na Dheiragain were impressive. But first we turned east and climbed the rigde to An Socach. The summit of this hill is only 30 minutes from the beallach and is easily gained. From the summit we retraced our steps and soon […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 11th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Tom a’Choinich

The day after our major tour of the Mullardoch Four (Oh, praise Alba for such marvellous days) we needed some rest. Starting late in the morming we set our sights on a moderate 16 kilometre hike of the two most eastern Glen Affric Munros, Toll Creagach and Tom a’ Choinich. From the parking on the north shore of Loch Bheinn a’ Mheadhoin we walked up the landrover track in Gleann nam Fiadh. The air was warm and the forrest on both sides of the track was interestingly diverse as regards the variety of different sorts of trees. There even was a wooden panel explaining the afforestation efforts of the Forrestry Commission (?).

After passing a gate we left the enclosed woodland and got into rather more open terrain. Once we reached the Allt Toll Easa we climbed the path on its right side for about 250m until we reached the upper corrie and the start of the southeast ridge of Tom a’ Choinich. This ridge proved to be quite rocky and entertaining being interspersed with surviving patches of last winter’s snow on some of the upper sections. Above the 1000m contour the slope levelled off and we strolled to the 1112m summit of the Tom. There we took a good long break and rested our aching bones. Then we proceeded in an easterly direction to the Bealach Toll Easa. The ridge leading to this coll again was narrow in places and rocky. Fine stuff. From the bealach we climbed a much broader ridge first to the west top of Toll Creagach and further on over a plateau-ish section to the final steepening before the stony summit of Toll Creagach.

Having enjoyed another pause at this second summit we walked due south over open grassy terrain to reach Beinn Eun. We passed this outlier of […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 10th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Toll Creagach

The day after our major tour of the Mullardoch Four (Oh, praise Alba for such marvellous days) we needed some rest. Starting late in the morming we set our sights on a moderate 16 kilometre hike of the two most eastern Glen Affric Munros, Toll Creagach and Tom a’ Choinich. From the parking on the north shore of Loch Bheinn a’ Mheadhoin we walked up the landrover track in Gleann nam Fiadh. The air was warm and the forrest on both sides of the track was interestingly diverse as regards the variety of different sorts of trees. There even was a wooden panel explaining the afforestation efforts of the Forrestry Commission (?). After passing a gate we left the enclosed woodland and got into rather more open terrain. Once we reached the Allt Toll Easa we climbed the path on its right side for about 250m until we reached the upper corrie and the start of the southeast ridge of Tom a’ Choinich. This ridge proved to be quite rocky and entertaining being interspersed with surviving patches of last winter’s snow on some of the upper sections. Above the 1000m contour the slope levelled off and we strolled to the 1112m summit of the Tom. There we took a good long break and rested our aching bones. Then we proceeded in an easterly direction to the Bealach Toll Easa. The ridge leading to this coll again was narrow in places and rocky. Fine stuff. From the bealach we climbed a much broader ridge first to the west top of Toll Creagach and further on over a plateau-ish section to the final steepening before the stony summit of Toll Creagach. Having enjoyed another pause at this second summit we walked due south over open grassy terrain to reach Beinn Eun. We passed this outlier of […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 10th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Carn nan Gobhar

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:51+00:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr na Lapaich

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+00:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

An Riabhachan

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this […]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+00:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|