An Socach

On a sunny morning Frank and me drove from Glen Strathfarrar to the Mullardoch dam. We left our car at the parking below the dam and embarked on our hike of the Mullardoch Four Group. From the dam we followed the path on the north side of Loch Mullardoch and soon crossed the little gorge of the Allt Mullardoch. From there we walked following a path of sorts and reached the Allt Taige which Frank crossed by jumping over some slippery stepping stones while I prefered to wade through the stream after some hesitation and deliberation.

From there it was a steady and beautiful walk on the easy path which leads to the stalkers’ bothy at the foot of the Allt Socrach and the Allt Coire a’Mhaim. There we rested after about three hours of walking and then we continued up the track by the Allt Coire a’Mhaim way into the corrie of the same name. Once we got there we crossed the bowl of the corrie over some boggy ground and then climbed the steep grassy south-eastern ridge of Meall a’Chaisg. After having walked over two flatter stretches of grass and a final steepening weeventually got to the corrie rim and could see the summit of An Socach on the other side of the corrie.

We continued along the curving ridge and reached the summit of An Socach after 5 hours an 50 minutes of walking. What a perfect view point! We enjoyed the views of the Glen Carron and Strathfarrar hills and rested for some time. Then we packed our stuff. The summit of An Socach being the turning point of our tour we now continued along the ridge in a roughly easterly direction across the deep gap of Beallach a’Bholla to the first top of An Riabhachan. The climb to this top was steep and on the final section we had to cross a tiny snow field. Once at the 1040 metre top we drank some water and took a … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 9th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr nan Conbhairean

This group of three Munros is easily accessible from the A87 and the hills are not too far away from Inverness where Alex had to catch a train in the evening. On a sunny morning we drove from Glen Strathfarrar to Loch Cluanie and left our car at the big parking near Lundie. From there Alex, Frank and me walked along a Landrover track which once was part of the Old Military Road. Soon a path branched off to the right, skirted An Cruachan and reached a stretch of flatter terrain. We headed towards the western ridge of Carn Ghluasaid and climbed up the steep rocky side of the ridge where good views of the hills in the south and west added to fun of walking.

The path finally peters out on the plateau-ish summit area of the hill and soon afterwards we touched the cairn. From there we continued along the corrie rim for some time, then by-passed point 998m and started the final 150 m climb to Sgurr nan Conbhairean from the Glas Bhealach. At the summit of our second munro of the day we rested. A jolly good viewpoint for the hills close by. A’Chralaig, Mullach Fraoch-choire, South and North Glen Shiel ridge and Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan to mention a few. The wind had picked up considerably since we had started our hike and it made walking a little difficult at times. The weather was fine, though. On our continuation down the north ridge of Sgurr nan Conbhairean the wind bombarded us with bits of icy snow dislodged from the remains of snow-fields and cornices from time to time. Funny. It did not take very long to reach the third summit of the day, Sail Chaorainn. Another little break and then we retraced our steps back to Sgurr nan Conbhairean. We did not climb back to the summit of this hill but traversed 100m below summit height on the western slopes. This delivered us on the south-west ridge and the … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 8th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Sail Chaorainn

This group of three Munros is easily accessible from the A87 and the hills are not too far away from Inverness where Alex had to catch a train in the evening. On a sunny morning we drove from Glen Strathfarrar to Loch Cluanie and left our car at the big parking near Lundie. From there Alex, Frank and me walked along a Landrover track which once was part of the Old Military Road. Soon a path branched off to the right, skirted An Cruachan and reached a stretch of flatter terrain. We headed towards the western ridge of Carn Ghluasaid and climbed up the steep rocky side of the ridge where good views of the hills in the south and west added to fun of walking. The path finally peters out on the plateau-ish summit area of the hill and soon afterwards we touched the cairn. From there we continued along the corrie rim for some time, then by-passed point 998m and started the final 150 m climb to Sgurr nan Conbhairean from the Glas Bhealach. At the summt of our second munro of the day we rested. A jolly good viewpoint for the hills close by. A’Chralaig, Mullach Fraoch-choire, South and North Glen Shiel ridge and Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan to mention a few. The wind had picked up considerably since we had started our hike and it made walking a little difficult at times. The weather was fine, though. On our continuation down the north ridge of Sgurr nan Conbhairean the wind bombarded us with bits of icy snow dislodged from the remains of snow-fields and cornices from time to time. Funny. It did not take very long to reach the third summit of the day, Sail Chaorainn. Another little break and then we retraced our steps back to Sgurr nan Conbhairean. We did not climb back to the summit of this hill but traversed 100m below summit height on the western slopes. This delivered us on the south-west ridge and the … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 8th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Carn Ghluasaid

This group of three Munros is easily accessible from the A87 and the hills are not too far away from Inverness where Alex had to catch a train in the evening. On a sunny morning we drove from Glen Strathfarrar to Loch Cluanie and left our car at the big parking near Lundie. From there Alex, Frank and me walked along a Landrover track which once was part of the Old Military Road. Soon a path branched off to the right, skirted An Cruachan and reached a stretch of flatter terrain. We headed towards the western ridge of Carn Ghluasaid and climbed up the steep rocky side of the ridge where good views of the hills in the south and west added to fun of walking. The path finally peters out on the plateauish summit area of the hill and soon afterwards we touched the cairn. From there we continued along the corrie rim for some time, then by-passed point 998m and started the final 150 m climb to Sgurr nan Conbhairean from the Glas Bhealach. At the summt of our second munro of the day we rested. A jolly good viewpoint for the hills close by. A’Chralaig, Mullach Fraoch-choire, South and North Glen Shiel ridge and Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan to mention a few. The wind had picked up considerably since we had started our hike and it made walking a little difficult at times. The weather was fine, though. On our continuation down the north ridge of Sgurr nan Conbhairean the wind bombarded us with bits of icy snow dislodged from the remains of snow-fields and cornices from time to time. Funny. It did not take very long to reach the third summit of the day, Sail Chaorainn. Another little break and then we retraced our steps back to Sgurr nan Conbhairean. We did not climb back to the summit of this hill but traversed 100m below summit height on the western slopes. This delivered us on the south-west ridge and the … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 8th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Affric and Kintail|

Sgurr Fuar-thuill

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic. From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image.

From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack. Then we descended the north-western ridge of the hill which was still covered in steep snow. We met another group of three hill-walkers, relatives of the gentlemen we ran into before.

From the bealach between Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais … [Read More]

2019-02-24T10:08:55+02:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr na Ruaidhe

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic. From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image. From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack. Then we descended the north-western ridge of the hill which was still covered in steep snow. We met another group of three hill-walkers, relatives of the gentlemen we ran into before. From the bealach between Sgurr … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Carn nan Gobhar

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic.

From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image. From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack.

Then we descended the north-western ridge of the hill which was still covered in steep snow. We met another group of three hill-walkers, relatives of the gentlemen we ran into before. From the bealach between Sgurr … [Read More]

2018-12-15T11:48:25+02:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais

On our first day in the Strathfarrar Region of the Highlands we set out to walk the group of four Munros which are easily accessible from Glen Strathfarrar once you are past the locked gate at Inchmore. This being no obstacle to us since we stayed at Culligran, we drove the road leading into the glen in order to determine whether we wanted to do the walk clockwise or anti-clockwise. Finally after some minutes of definite indecision we reached the dam of Loch Monar and had a look around there. A desolate but beautiful spot of the Highlands. Then, finally, we made up our mind and left the car at the parking close to the confluence of the River Strathfarrar and the Allt Toll a’ Mhuic.

From there we walked up the (landrover-)track on the right-hand side of the burn. The going was easy enough and we soon reached Loch Toll a’Mhuic. There we saw eight elegant white swans swimming on the water of the loch perched beautifully below the cliffs of Sgurr na Muice. A highly enchanting and totally unexpected image. From the Loch we climbed the grassy path into the upper corrie. From there we walked in mist over increasingly steep and treacherous snowfields until the fog finally cleared and the way ahead to the beallach between Sgurr na Fearstaig and the first Munro of the day, Sgurr Fhuar-thuill, was revealed. On the ridge we met another walker with whom we chatted a bit. From the summit of our first Munro we pressed onward and followed the easy ridge over Creag Choire a’Bhealaich and the subsequent col to Sgurr a’Choire Ghlais the highest and most impressive hill of the tour. At the cairn of Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais we had a break and a snack. Then we descended the north-western ridge of the hill which was still covered in steep snow. We met another group of three hill-walkers, relatives of the gentlemen we ran into before. From the bealach between Sgurr … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:52+02:00May 7th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Glen Cannich to Glen Carron|

Beinn Udlamain

The first day of the 2006 walking holiday had seen Alex, Frank and me stomp up and down Shiehallion in three hours. The second tour of three of the western Drumochter Hills was squeezed into the transfer day from Perthshire to Glen Strathfarrar where our chalet was. Starting the hike at the beginning of the landrover track into Coire Dhomhain we walked up this glen with the Sow of Atholl to the left and the Boar of Badenoch to the right. After two kilometres we left the track, crossed the Allt Coire Dhomhain and headed for the bealach between the Sow and Sgairneach Mhor. The going was easy over grassy and mossy terrain which was not too wet. Fine conditions. Soon we reached the bealach and continued due west along the rim of Corrie Creagach. The remains of massive cornices were still there and the arching corrie rim was a beautiful sight. Then we attained the summit of Sgairneach Mhor. Off we went over the grassy plateu to the very head of Coire Dhomhain and the foot of Carn ‘Ic Loumhaidh which we climbed to get onto the ridge leading to the highest hill of the tramp, Beinn Udlamain at 1011 m. At Beinn Udlamain’s summit we met another group of hill walkers and we all huddled close by the cairn searching shelter from the strong wind. From Beinn Udlamain we set out on the three kilometre stretch of ridge leading to A’ Mharconaich skirting around Fraoch-Choire. After 35 or 40 minutes we arrived at the summit cairn of the third munro of the day which I had visited in autumn 2002 already. From there we descended steep slopes of grass and snow in a south easterly direction back into Coire Dhomhain where we hit the landrover track and walked back to the A9 and our car. An easy circuit of three hills with great views of Loch Ericht and Ben Alder. Relaxed walking, quick progress and nice cornices above Coire Creagach. A … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+02:00May 6th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|

Sgairneach Mhor

The first day of the 2006 walking holiday had seen Alex, Frank and me stomp up and down Shiehallion in three hours. The second tour of three of the western Drumochter Hills was squeezed into the transfer day from Perthshire to Glen Strathfarrar where our chalet was. Starting the hike at the beginning of the landrover track into Coire Dhomhain we walked up this glen with the Sow of Atholl to the left and the Boar of Badenoch to the right. After two kilometres we left the track, crossed the Allt Coire Dhomhain and headed for the bealach between the Sow and Sgairneach Mhor. The going was easy over grassy and mossy terrain which was not too wet. Fine conditions. Soon we reached the bealach and continued due west along the rim of Corrie Creagach. The remains of massive cornices were still there and the arching corrie rim was a beautiful sight. Then we attained the summit of Sgairneach Mhor. Off we went over the grassy plateu to the very head of Coire Dhomhain and the foot of Carn ‘Ic Loumhaidh which we climbed to get onto the ridge leading to the highest hill of the tramp, Beinn Udlamain at 1011 m. At Beinn Udlamain’s summit we met another group of hill walkers and we all huddled close by the cairn searching shelter from the strong wind. From Beinn Udlamain we set out on the three kilometre stretch of ridge leading to A’ Mharconaich skirting around Fraoch-Choire. After 35 or 40 minutes we arrived at the summit cairn of the third munro of the day which I had visited in autumn 2002 already. From there we descended steep slopes of grass and snow in a south easterly direction back into Coire Dhomhain where we hit the landrover track and walked back to the A9 and our car. An easy circuit of three hills with great views of Loch Ericht and Ben Alder. Relaxed walking, quick progress and nice cornices above Coire Creagach. A … [Read More]

2017-09-19T14:17:53+02:00May 6th, 2006|2006, 2009 - 2000, Loch Rannoch to Drumochter|